So You *Really* Want To Monitor Kafka…

Yeva Byzek walks through Confluent Platform:

Kafka exposes hundreds of metrics. Some of them are per broker, per client, per topic, and per partition, and so the number of metrics scales up as the cluster grows. For an average-size Kafka cluster, the number of metrics very quickly bloats to the thousands.

Warning: I am about to disappoint you. You probably recognize that you realistically cannot monitor every single available metric. So you are probably hoping that in this blog post I will filter down the list of metrics to a dozen of the most critical ones, which you would then push through some generic monitoring tool, and then be done with setting up “monitoring.” However, monitoring distributed systems like Kafka is not that simple, and so there is no such list. Keep reading to understand the problems you should be solving, and how to solve them in a robust monitoring solution specifically designed for Kafka.

A common pitfall of generic monitoring tools is that they import all available metrics from a variety of systems into a metrics swamp. Even with a comprehensive list of metrics, there is a limit to what can be achieved with no Kafka context nor Kafka expertise to determine which metrics are important and which ones are not. A metrics swamp cannot produce valuable insight from the data nor provide answers to the critical business questions we asked earlier.

This is an information-dense post that you’ll want to read if you work with Apache Kafka.

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