Data Lake Archive Tier

Ust Oldfeld looks at an important part of a data lake:

The Archive access tier in blob storage was made generally available today (13th December 2017) and with it comes the final piece in the puzzle to archiving data from the data lake.

Where Hot and Cool access tiers can be applied at a storage account level, the Archive access tier can only be applied to a blob storage container. To understand why the Archive access tier can only be applied to a container, you need to understand the features of the Archive access tier. It is intended for data that has no or low SLAs for availability within an organisation and the data is stored offline (Hot and Cool access tiers are online). Therefore, it can take up to 15 hours for data to be made online and available. Brining Archive data online is a process called rehydration (fitting for the data lake). If you have lots of blob containers in a storage account, you can archive them and rehydrate them as required, rather than having to rehydrate the entire storage account.

Read on for more details, including a pattern for archiving data lake data.

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