“Caveman” Graphs In SQL

Denis Gobo puts together some basic Management Studio data visualization:

I found this technique on Rich Benner’s SQL Server Blog: Visualising the Marvel Cinematic Universe in T-SQL and decided to play around with it after someone asked me to give him the sizes of all databases on a development instance of SQL Server

The way it works is that you take the size of the database and then divide that number against the total size of all databases. You then use the replicate function with the | (pipe) character to generate the ‘graph’  so 8% will look like this ||||||||

You can use this for tables with most rows, a count per state etc etc. By looking at the output the graph column adds a nice visual effect to it IMHO

It does the job and doesn’t require you to go out to a different product, so it works pretty well for occasional administrative queries.

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