The Downside Of Trusted Assemblies

Solomon Rutzky does not like the Trusted Assembly solution to SQL Server 2017 CLR:

Hopefully, Microsoft removes all traces of “Trusted Assemblies” (as I have suggested here). In either case, please just use Certificates (and possibly Asymmetric Keys, depending on your preference and situation) as I have demonstrated in these past three posts (i.e. Parts 2, 3, and 4). Even better, especially for those using SSDT, would be if Microsoft implemented my suggestion to allow Asymmetric Keys to be created from a binary hex bytes string. But, even without that convenience, there is still no reason to ever, ever, use the “Trusted Assemblies” feature.

He’s given three alternatives so far, so if you’re interested in CLR security, there’s plenty of food for thought.

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