Sharepoint And MAXDOP=1

Daniel Glenn has a public service announcement on Sharepoint maximum degree of parallelism:

For my first install test, I was using a service account that did have administrative rights on SQL as well. I looked at the setting in SQL and SharePoint 2016 did change the Maximum Degree Of Parallelism setting to 1. So, the story is, as of now anyway (we are dealing with Preview software), SharePoint Server 2016 requires MAXDOP=1.

Kidding about Sharepoint aside, if you do have Sharepoint in your environment, it’s worth knowing how to configure it correctly.

Understanding ACID Properties

Randolph West explains the basics of ACID properties and gives a high-level description of how relational databases typically ensure these properties:

Relational database management systems (RDBMS) such as SQL Server, Oracle, MySQL, and PostgreSQL use transactions to allow concurrent users to select, insert, update, and delete data without affecting everyone else.

An RDBMS is considered ACID-compliant if it can guarantee data integrity during transactions under the following conditions:

Read on for more.

Tracking DDL Events

Kenneth Fisher has a simple database trigger to track certain data definition language events:

A couple of notes before testing the code. The event groups I’m using will pull CREATE, ALTER and DELETE events for those objects. For a more complete list of events (you might want to add service broker events for example) go here. Also I’m using ORIGINAL_LOGIN because it will return who made the change even if they are impersonating someone else.

For my test, I created a user that only has db_DDLADMIN on the database. That means it can make DDL changes but can’t insert, update, delete or even run a select against any table in the database. That’s why I grant INSERT to public for the logging table.

It’s a good way of knowing when unexpected changes happen, too.

Installing DBATools Offline

Chrissy LeMaire shows how to save the dbatools module to install it offline:

There are essentially 3 ways to get the zip of our module

  1. From PowerShell Gallery using Save-Module

  2. From PowerShell Gallery by downloading from powershellgallery.com/api/v2/package/dbatools

  3. By downloading from dbatools.io/zip

Read on to see examples for each of the three methods.

Kafka As A Backbone

Ben Stopford explains how to use Kafka as a backbone for a microservices architecture:

Taking a log-structured approach has an interesting side effect. Both reads and writes are sequential operations. This makes them sympathetic to the underlying media, leveraging pre-fetch, the various layers of caching and naturally batching operations together. This makes them efficient. In fact, when you read messages from Kafka, the server doesn’t even import them into the JVM. Data is copied directly from the disk buffer to the network buffer. An opportunity afforded by the simplicity of both the contract and the underlying data structure.

So batched, sequential operations help with overall performance. They also make the system well suited to storing messages longer term. Most traditional message brokers are built using index structures, hash tables or B-trees, used to manage acknowledgements, filter message headers, and remove messages when they have been read. But the downside is that these indexes must be maintained. This comes at a cost. They must be kept in memory to get good performance, limiting retention significantly. But the log is O(1) when either reading or writing messages to a partition, so whether the data is on disk or cached in memory matters far less.

This is a higher-level look and helps explain why I like Kafka so much as a message broker.

R Services Internals

Niels Berglund has an excellent series on R Services internals.  Here’s the latest post:

This post is the ninth post about Microsoft SQL Server R Services, and the eight post that drills down into the internal of how it works.

So far in this series we have been looking at what happens in SQL Server as well as the launchpad service when we execute sp_execute_external_script, and we have still no real “clue” to where the R engine comes into play.

Well, hopefully that will change (at least a little bit) with this post, as we here will look at what happens when we leave the launchpad service.

This series is like candy to me.  It’s the best write-up I’ve seen so far about what’s really happening when you run SQL Server R Services.

Powershell Parameter VAlidation

Adam Bertram shows how to write safer code by validating parameters:

Simply adding [Parameter()] to the parameter block makes this function “advanced.” Once we have this in place, we can then add in some parameter validation code. In our case, we need to ensure that the file provided with FilePath actually exists before proceeding. To do this, we’ll use the ValidateScript attribute which allows us to run any code we want. As long as it returns $true, it will allow the function to run.

function Set-File {
param(
[Parameter()]
[ValidateScript({ Test-Path -Path $_ -PathType Leaf})]
[string]$FilePath
)
}

Notice that I used the pipeline variable $_ in this example. This represents whatever value the parameter is. If the user provides a file path that does not exist, they will be notified.

Read the whole thing.

Multiple Data Sets In External Scripts

Tomaz Kastrun shows a workaround to the “one data set” limit in sp_execute_external_script:

Some of the  arguments of the procedure sp_execute_external_script are enumerated. This is valid for the inputting dataset and as the name of argument @input_data_1 suggests, one can easily (and this is valid doubt) think, there can also be @input_data_2 argument, and so on. Unfortunately, this is not true.  External procedure can hold only one T-SQL dataset, inserted through this parameter.

There are many reasons for that, one would be the cost of sending several datasets to external process and back, so inadvertently, this forces user to rethink and pre-prepare the dataset (meaning, do all the data munging beforehand), prior to sending it into external procedure.

But there are workarounds on how to pass additional query/queries to sp_execute_external_script. I am not advocating this, and I strongly disagree with such usage, but here it is.

It does feel like a hinky solution, but sometimes you just need to get two data sets in.

Using Watchtower To Refresh SQL Server Containers

Andrew Pruski explains how to use Watchtower to keep your SQL Server Docker containers up to date:

The databases that I store in my container image are updated on a weekly basis and currently, the process to update our containers is manual. Once the updated image has been created, the existing running containers are dropped and new ones created from the updated image.

But what if we could automatically refresh our containers with the updated image? If we could do that then the only process that’s manual is updating the image. We would no longer have to worry about any containers running SQL instances with databases that are out of date.

Luckily, there’s a way to do this and it’s accessible via an image on the Docker Hub called Watchtower. What Watchtower does is monitor the Docker Hub and if there’s an update to an image it will automatically refresh all running containers that are on the same host.

Read on for a step-by-step solution.

SQLOS Task Origins

Ewald Cress explains how SQLOS tasks come into being:

The above system tasks wear their purpose on their sleeves, because the function pointer in the SOS_Task::Param is, well, to the point. The tasks that run user queries are more abstract, because the I/O completion port listener can’t be bothered with understanding much beyond the rudiments of reading network packets – it certainly can’t be mucking about with fluent TDS skills, SQL parsing and compilation, or permission checks.

So what it does is to enqueue a task that speaks TDS well, pointing it to a bunch of bytes, and sending it on its way. Here is an example of such a dispatch, which shows the “input” side of the WorkDispatcher:

Read the whole thing.

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