Tracking Database Restorations

Erik Darling points out that figuring out when a database restoration occurs is much more difficult than you’d hope:

Astute SQL-ers may attempt to add a trigger to the restorehistory table over in msdb. It’s in the dbo schema, which might make you hopeful. We all know triggers in that pesky sys schema don’t do a darn thing.

You guessed it, restores get tracked there. So there’s, like, something inside SQL telling it when a restore happens.

Guess what, though? A trigger on that table won’t fire. Not FOR INSERT, not AFTER INSERT, and not nothin’ in between.

Read on for more things that don’t work…  Also check out the comments; I think Dave Mason has the best answer there.

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