Managing Data Lake Analytics Compute

Yan Li has a three-part series looking at management of Azure Data Lake compute.  First, an overview:

Scenario 2: Set One Specific Group to Different Limits

New members are joining and sharing the same ADLA account. To prevent any new members, who are just learning ADLA, from mistakenly submitting a job that consumes too much compute resource (increasing cost and blocking other jobs), customers want to set the maximum AU per job for new employees at 30 AUs while others can submit jobs with up to 100 AUs.

Default Policy:

  • Job AU limit: 100
  • Priority limit: 1

Exception Policy: New Employee Policy

  • Job AU limit: 30

  • Priority limit:  200

  • Group: New Employee Group

Next up is a look at job-level policies:

With job-level policies, you can control the maximum AUs and the maximum priority that individual users (or members of security groups) can set on the jobs that they submit. This allows you to not only control the costs incurred by your users but also control the impact they might have on high priority production jobs running in the same ADLA account.

There are two parts to a job level policy:

  • Default Policy: This is the policy that is applied to all users of the service.
  • Exceptions: The set of “exception” policies apply to specific users.

Submitted jobs that do not violate the job-level policies are still subject to the account level policies as described in Azure Data Lake Analytics Account Level Policy.

Finally, account-level policies:

ADLA supports three types of account-level policies:

  • Maximum AUs  — Controls the maximum number of AUs that can be used by running jobs

  • Maximum Number of Running Jobs  — Controls the maximum number of concurrently running jobs.

  • Days to Retain Job Queries  — Controls how long detailed information about jobs are retained in the users ADLS account.

There’s a good amount of information here.

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