Dynamic DNS And Powershell

Drew Furgiuele explains dynamic DNS and shows how to use Powershell to keep your Google Dynamic DNS record up to date:

Google’s Dynamic DNS API is really little less than a HTTPS POST to a specific URL with some parameters packed into the post. What makes it work, though, is for each dynamic DNS host name you provide, you get an auto-generated user name and password that needs to be part of the POST. PowerShell is really naturally suited for this type of automation, thanks to Invoke-WebRequest (MSDN Link). It’s built for this, and even supports HTTPS. Heck, it even supports the implementation of username:password in the request via a PSCredential object.

All I really needed to do was to wrap the code in a function and add some parameters that can be passed in, invoke the web request, and parse the results.

Click through for more information, including a couple Powershell scripts.

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