SQL On Linux Connectivity

Slava Murygin troubleshoots connectivity issues with SQL Server on Linux:

After you enter SA password you have to get “vNext” version of your SQL Server.
If you did not get the correct response you might have following problems:
I)   Wrong SA password. To fix it, just re-configure SQL Server.
II)  SQL Server Tools are not installed.
III) Typo. Check your syntax.

The troubleshooting process is a bit different from SQL Server on Windows, but it’s still pretty straightforward.

Avoiding Percent Growth

Angela Henry has a script to tame percent growth on database files:

I decided I needed to do something else other than just send an email notification, I needed to take corrective action when it occurred.  So I wrote a little stored procedure that will take the ALTER DATABASE statement as a parameter, parse it and take the appropriate corrective action. 

Simple enough, right?  Now I just need to add the call to my newly created stored procedure in my server level trigger and we are good to go.  But wait, you can’t ALTER a database within an ALTER DATABASE statement (don’t believe me? Use this as a learning exercise to see what happens when you try).  So what could I do?  There are several things you could do, but I chose to create a table that could hold this newly created ALTER DATABASE statement and insert the record there.  Then I created a SQL Agent job that runs once every hour and reads that table and executes any entries it finds, then deletes them after successfully executing.

Read the whole thing, including the disclaimer.

Time Zone Info Table

Kevin Feasel

2017-02-01

Data

Andrea Allred notes that there’s now a time zone system table, as of SQL Server 2016:

Yes, it is 132 rows of magic! Now that we have this super cool table, how do we use it? Let’s pretend that my data is time-stamped in US Mountain Standard Time, but I want to display it in Western Australia Standard Time.

Read on for table details.

Powershell Defaults

Michael Sorens has some time-saving defaults for Powershell:

Besides setting up some convenient shortcuts for use with built-in cmdlets, for developers it is also handy to be able to work some magic with your own custom cmdlets. In my shop, for example, we have one module containing a couple dozen cmdlets, many of which use a common parameter, Mode. This Mode parameter varies from client to client, but for any single client, every cmdlet working on their data needs to use the same value of Mode. So I have to add -Mode hist-0010-dev.test onto each cmdlet I am using, which gets very tiring/annoying very quickly. You could, of course, put that value into a variable and then just use, e .g. -Mode $myMode, which is less typing, but if less is better, then no typing at all is better still.

There are a lot of tips in this article, so take some time with it.

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