Powershell Defaults

Michael Sorens has some time-saving defaults for Powershell:

Besides setting up some convenient shortcuts for use with built-in cmdlets, for developers it is also handy to be able to work some magic with your own custom cmdlets. In my shop, for example, we have one module containing a couple dozen cmdlets, many of which use a common parameter, Mode. This Mode parameter varies from client to client, but for any single client, every cmdlet working on their data needs to use the same value of Mode. So I have to add -Mode hist-0010-dev.test onto each cmdlet I am using, which gets very tiring/annoying very quickly. You could, of course, put that value into a variable and then just use, e .g. -Mode $myMode, which is less typing, but if less is better, then no typing at all is better still.

There are a lot of tips in this article, so take some time with it.

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