Threading And Learning

Jay Robinson has a two-pronged tale:

This reminds me of an old saying: If you’re the smartest person in the room, then you’re in the wrong room.*

Now, this is not a commentary on my current team. I work with some really smart people, and I’m very grateful for that. But while my teammate may be one of the best PHP or Node.js coders I know, that doesn’t necessarily translate to an expertise with the .NET Framework. The true test is this – no matter how smart they are, if they’re not catching my mistakes, then I’m not being held accountable.

There is some good advice here on threading (yes, definitely use the newer threading libraries), but also good advice on surrounding yourself with intelligent people who can catch your mistakes.

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Using the ML.NET Model Builder

I have a post looking at the ML.NET Model Builder: You have four options from which to choose: two-class classification, multi-class classification, regression, or Choose Your Own Adventure. Today, we’re going to create a two-class classification model. Incidentally, they’re not kidding about things changing in preview—last time I looked at this, they didn’t have multi-class […]

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Creating Models with ML.NET

I have a series on ML.NET; in this post, I look at building a model: Okay, now that I have classes, I need to put in that lambda. I guess the lambda could change to qb => qb.Quarterback == "Josh Allen" ? "Josh Allen" : "Nate Barkerson" and that’d work except for one itsy-bitsy thing: if I […]

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