Thinking About Dead Connections

Lonny Niederstadt has a half-baked idea on dead connections:

In SQL Server 2005, a valuable addition was made.  SQL Server would use a “Keep Alive” value specified specifically per instance, rather than the KeepAliveTime specified by the Windows registry.  It defaulted to 30000 ms/30 seconds.

The blog post below explains this new addition, and mentions that the interval for SQL Server will be a fixed 1000 ms/1 second, regardless of the KeepAliveInterval specified in the Windows registry. At the time SQL Server 2005 was introduced, TCPMaxDataRetransmissions from the Windows registries still controlled the maximum number of probes.

Read on for more.

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Safely Dropping Databases

Bob Pusateri notes a little issue when it comes to dropping databases: At a previous employer, we had a well-defined process when dropping databases for a client. It went something like this: Confirm in writing the databases on which servers/instances to be dropped Take a final full backup of databases Take databases offline Wait at […]

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New DMF: dm_db_page_info

Pam Lahoud shows off a new Dynamic Management Function in SQL Server 2019: The primary use case we had in mind when developing this function was troubleshooting page-related waits. Some of the key performance scenarios that require page details to diagnose are tempdb contention, last page insert contention (also see this blog articlefor code samples) and page-level blocking. All of […]

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