Doomed Transactions

Michael Swart talks about doomed transactions:

So the procedure was complicated and it used explicit transactions, but I couldn’t find any TRY/CATCH blocks anywhere! What I needed was a stack trace, but for T-SQL. People don’t talk about T-SQL stack traces very often. Probably because they don’t program like this in T-SQL. We can’t get a T-SQL stack trace from the SQLException (the error given to the client), so we have to get it from the server.

Michael shows how to get stack trace information and provides some advice on the process (mostly, “don’t do what we did”).

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