Windows 10 IoT Code To Back Up Databases

Drew Furgiuele writes code to back up your databases using a Raspberry Pi 3 and Windows 10 IoT edition:

The trickiest part of wiring a circuit like this is detecting a button press. Most logic boards don’t know if an input circuit should poll at high or low levels. That’s where pull-ups come in. Above, you can see we set one of the pins for the button to be a pull-up (or an input if we were using another board). That means it will pull the current and look for impedance. The other important thing is our debounce. With circuits, one button press can actually turn into lots because as soon as the switch completes (or interrupts) the circuit, it starts sending signals. A debounce is like a referee saying “only look for a signal for this long” and it will filter out extra “presses” based on current that might linger on a press.

Once we detect our button press, we’re calling the function below. All it does is read the current LED pin values, and looks to see which one is currently lit, and then lights the next one.

Go from understanding general purpose input/output pins to calling SMO via a web service all in one post.  If you’ve got an itch for a weekend project, have at it.

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