Upgrade To 2016?

Kendra Little explains why upgrading to 2016 is a good idea:

I know most of y’all care about Standard Edition.

With SP1, you can use all sorts of (formerly) super-expensive features like data compression, partitioning, Columnstore, Change Data Capture, Polybase, and more in Standard Edition.

A few features have scalability caps in “lower” editions. There’s a memory limit for In-Memory OLTP (aka Hekaton), and Columnstore. Columnstore also has restrictions on parallelism.

I’ll also throw out my experience as an anecdote:  2016 has been more stable than 2014 in our environment.  I don’t regret going to 2014, but we’re better off on 2016.

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