Inside SQL Server 6.5

Brent Ozar reviews a blast from the past:

I picked up half a dozen used books about SQL Server 6.5, then spent a delightful weekend reading them. Seriously delightful – lemme tell you just how into it I was. Erika and I eat all weekend meals out at restaurants, but she saw me so happily curled up in my chair reading that she insisted on going out and getting tacos for us just so I wouldn’t have to get up. I was having that good of a time READING BOOKS ABOUT SQL SERVER 6.5. (Also, Erika is amazing. Moving on.)

To bring you that same fun, I wanna share with you a few pages from Inside SQL Server 6.5 by Ron Soukup, one of the fathers of SQL Server

It’s a great read.  My contribution to the Old But Good oeuvre is the Handbook of Relational Database Design by Candace Fleming and Barbar von Halle.  For my money, it has what I still consider the best primer on database normalization out there.  It also has a bunch of stuff that we should be glad we don’t do anymore, like figuring out specific file layouts for non-clustered indexes to minimize the number of disk rotations needed to retrieve a record of data.

R 3.5.0 Released

Kevin Feasel

2018-04-24

R, Versions

Tal Galili announces that R 3.5.0 is now available:

  • By default the (arbitrary) signs of the loadings from princomp() are chosen so the first element is non-negative.

  • If –default-packages is not used, then Rscript now checks the environment variable R_SCRIPT_DEFAULT_PACKAGES. If this is set, then it takes precedence over R_DEFAULT_PACKAGES. If default packages are not specified on the command line or by one of these environment variables, then Rscript now uses the same default packages as R. For now, the previous behavior of not including methods can be restored by setting the environment variable R_SCRIPT_LEGACY to yes.

  • When a package is found more than once, the warning from find.package(*, verbose=TRUE) lists all library locations.

  • POSIXt objects can now also be rounded or truncated to month or year.

Click through for the long, long list of changes.  H/T R-Bloggers

Upgrading SQL Server 2017 Standard Edition

Jo Douglass hits an error when upgrading to SQL Server 2017 on Standard Edition:

A quick one to signal boost this issue and its solution, as I’m sure other people will run into it. If you’re on Standard Edition of SQL Server and upgrading to 2017, you might run into an issue where the database services portion of the upgrade fails. This seems to be related to SSIS.

If you experience this problem, mid-way through the upgrade you’ll receive this error in a pop-up:

Wait on the Database Engine recovery handle failed. Check the SQL Server error log for potential causes.

At the end of the upgrade, it will show that the database services section has failed. Checking the error log will show this:

Script level upgrade for database ‘master’ failed because upgrade step ‘ISServer_upgrade.sql’ encountered error 917, state 1, severity 15.

Read on for the answer and a workaround.

Hadoop 3.1 Released

Wangda Tan and Vinod Kumar Vavilapalli have a post on Hadoop 3.1.0:

This release is *not* yet ready for production use. Critical issues are being ironed out via testing and downstream adoption. Production users should wait for a 3.1.1/3.1.2 release.

The Hadoop community fixed 768 JIRAs (https://s.apache.org/apache-hadoop-3.1.0-all-tickets) in total as part of the 3.1.0 release. Of these fixes:
– 141 in Hadoop Common
– 266 in HDFS
– 329 in YARN
– 32 in MapReduce
Apache Hadoop 3.1.0 contains a number of significant features and enhancements.

YARN supporting GPUs and FPGAs is very interesting.

Query Store And CU4

Erin Stellato notes that if you ran SQL Server 2017 CU2 with Query Store, you want to upgrade and run a special script:

There is a Query Store fix in the latest Cumulative Updates of SQL Server 2017, and if you are keeping current with the latest cumulative updates, there’s a script you need to run if you’ve installed CU2 at any point.

First, if you are still on CU2, you might want to consider upgrading to CU4 (released February 17, 2018).

Second, if you previously had CU2 installed (and are now on CU3 or CU4), you want to make sure that you’ve run the script included with CU3 and CU4 release notes.

The script removes plans from Query Store that were captured when running CU2.

Read the whole thing and keep those servers patched.

New SQL Server 2017 On Windows Docker Container

Perry Skountrianos announces that SQL Server 2017 Developer & Express editions (running Windows Server 1709) are now available on Docker Hub:

Windows Server version 1709 brings the following important improvements that developers can take advantage of with the updated container images.

  1. First of all, the microsoft/windowsservercore image underneath SQL shrunk by more than 2GB, so the SQL Server images are also 2GB smaller.

  2. The networking support for containers was improved to support Kubernetes, now at beta in version 1.9 beta on Windows, and routing mesh with Docker Swarm.

  3. If you want to store your databases on remote storage, you can now by using global SMB mounts (New-SMBGlobalMapping) along with a docker volume (docker run -v c:\shared:c:\data microsoft/mssql-express-…).

Seems like a useful improvement.

Hortonworks DataFlow 3.1 Released

George Vetticaden and Haimo Liu announce Hortonworks DataFlow version 3.1:

Apache Kafka 1.0 support with full integration with HDF Services – Kafka 1.0 provides important new features including more stringent message processing semantics with support for message headers and transactions, performance improvements and advanced security options.

  • Apache Ambari support for Kafka 1.0 – Install, configure, manage, upgrade, monitor, and secure Kafka 1.0 clusters with Ambari.

  • Apache Ranger support for Kafka 1.0 – Manage access control policies (ACLs) using resource or tag-based security for Kafka 1.0 clusters.

  • New NiFi and SAM processors for Kafka 1.0 – New processors in NiFi and Hortonworks Streaming Analytics Manager (SAM) support Kafka 1.0 features including message headers and transactions.

Click through for the list of top changes.

Microsoft R Open 3.4.3

Kevin Feasel

2018-01-18

R, Versions

David Smith announces Microsoft R Open 3.4.3:

Microsoft R Open (MRO), Microsoft’s enhanced distribution of open source R, has been upgraded to version 3.4.3 and is now available for download for Windows, Mac, and Linux. This update upgrades the R language engine to the latest R (version 3.4.3) and updates the bundled packages (specifically: checkpointcurldoParallelforeach, and iterators) to new versions.

MRO is 100% compatible with all R packages. MRO 3.4.3 points to a fixed CRAN snapshot taken on January 1 2018, and you can see some highlights of new packages released since the prior version of MRO on the Spotlights page. As always, you can use the built-in checkpoint packageto access packages from an earlier date (for reproducibility) or a later date (to access new and updated packages).

That brings Microsoft up to speed with base R.

Getting dbatools To Version 1.0

Simone Bizzotto explains what it’s going to take to get dbatools up to version 1.0:

We’re looking for contributors to help us finally reach version 1.0. Currently, we are on par with Gmail’s beta schedule: a whopping 4 years. But, we’re almost there and need your help finalizing our changes. If you’re interested in helping us bring 1.0 alive, we identified four areas with 5 primary contacts on the SQL Server Community Slack:

  • Standardize param names (@wsmelton)
  • Create tests for existing functions (@cl and @niphlod)
  • Review existing function documentation (@alevyinroc or @gbargsley)
  • Prepare for 1.0 with “code style” (Bill of Health, more on that later)

As you can see, a few of us are the main reference (on GitHub and Slack, mostly) for each area.

Read the whole thing and, if you’ve found dbatools to be helpful in the past, see if there’s anything you can do to help them out a little in return.

Hadoop 3.0 Ships

Alex Woodie reports that Hadoop 3.0 is officially out there, and looks at what’s forthcoming in 3.1 and 3.2:

As we told you about last week, Hadoop 3.0 brings two big new features that are compelling in their own right. That includes support for erasure coding, which should boost storage efficiency by 50% thanks to more efficient data replication; and YARN Federation, which should allow Hadoop clusters to scale up to 40,000 nodes.

The delivery of Hadoop 3.0 shows that open open source community is responding to demands of industry, said Doug Cutting, original co-creator of Apache Hadoop and the chief architect at Cloudera.

“It’s tremendous to see this significant progress, from the raw tool of eleven years ago, to the mature software in today’s release,” he said in a press release.  “With this milestone, Hadoop better meets the requirements of its growing role in enterprise data systems.

But some of the new features in Hadoop 3.0 weren’t designed to bring immediate rewards to users. Instead, they pave the way for the Apache Hadoop community to deliver more compelling features with versions 3.1 and versions 3.2, according to  Hortonworks director of engineering Vinod Kumar Vavilapalli, who’s also a committer on the Apache Hadoop project.

“Hadoop 3.0 is actually a building block, a foundation, for more exciting things to come in 3.1 and 3.2,” he said.

Click through to see some of those exciting things.

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