Checking For Credentials

Denny Cherry uses a try-catch block to figure out if you can authenticate automatically and prompts you otherwise:

Runbooks are very powerful tools which allow you to automate PowerShell commands which need to be run at different times.  One of the problems that I’ve run across when dealing with Azure Runbooks is that there is no way to use the same script on prem during testing and the same script when deploying. This is because of the way that authentication has to be handled when setting up a runbook.

The best way to handle authentication within a runbook is to store the authentication within the Azure Automation configuration as a stored credential.  The problem here is that you can’t use this credential while developing your runbook in the normal Powershell ISE.

This is a clever idea.

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Retaining a Few Tables From a Large Set

Jana Sattainathan has a Powershell-based solution to eliminate all but a few tables in a database: Recently, I received a request to backup a dozen tables or so tables out of 12 thousand tables. I had to retain all the indexes, statistics etc. The goal was to hand this over to the vendor for analysis […]

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