Single Slices And Chart Slicers

Matt Allington has a post up on improving your Power BI user experience:

The example on the right adds more value over the one on the left.  The example on the right uses a column chart instead of a slicer.  The benefit of this is you can communicate more information to the user than you can with the static slicer.  In this case I am displaying the total value of each of the scenarios which means it is easy to see the relative difference between them.  And this all happens while still providing slicer capabilities thanks to the powerful cross filter feature in Power BI.  This is what I mean by adding value by thinking outside your old paradigms.

Definitely read the comments on this one; they are full of great questions and suggestions.

Related Posts

Power Query: Joining On Date Ranges

Reza Rad shows how to build merge joins between date ranges in Power Query: Customer’s table has the history details of changes through the time. For example, the customer ID 2, has a track of change. John was living in Sydney for a period of time, then moved to Melbourne after that. The problem we […]

Read More

What Is DAX?

Matt Allington covers some of the basics of DAX: Do I need to learn the DAX language? You certainly do not need to know how to write DAX to get started with Power BI.  Power BI is the newest business intelligence tool that leverages the DAX language (via Power Pivot) and it is definitely possible […]

Read More

Categories

July 2016
MTWTFSS
« Jun Aug »
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031