Continuous Integration

James Anderson is starting a series on continuous integration:

I had been using source control for years but it’s always felt like a tick box exercise that I was doing because I had to. I had never used it to review old versions to see where code went wrong or to quickly roll back changes if I decided I no longer wanted to go in a certain direction with the code. I never felt like I was getting anything back from using source control. Sometimes it takes a problem to arise for you to see the value of a solution.

In 2015 I started to inherit the code base for our internal maintenance database, the UtilityDB. This database is used to store performance metrics and to manage tasks such as index maintenance and backups. This database is installed on all of our instances.

This first post is an introduction to the series, and it looks like he’ll cover some heady topics.

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