Getting Started With Spark

I discuss getting up and running with Databricks Community Edition:

There are a couple of notes with these clusters:

  1. These are not powerful clusters.  Don’t expect to crunch huge data sets with them.  Notice that the cluster has only 6 GB of RAM, so you can expect to get maybe a few GB of data max.

  2. The cluster will automatically terminate after one hour without activity.  The paid version does not have this limitation.

  3. You interact with the cluster using notebooks rather than opening a command prompt.  In practice, this makes interacting with the cluster a little more difficult, as a good command prompt can provide features such as auto-complete.

Databricks Community Edition has a nice interface, is very easy to get up and running and—most importantly—is free.  Read the whole thing.

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