LAST_VALUE

Kevin Feasel

2016-06-22

T-SQL

Steve Jones plays with a window function new to SQL Server 2012:

The important thing to understand with window functions is that there is a frame at any point in time when the data is being scanned or processed. I’m not sure what the best term to use is.

Let’s look at the same data set Kathi used. For simplicity, I’ll use a few images of her dataset, but I’ll examine the SalesOrderID. I think that can be easier than looking at the amounts.

Here’s the base dataset for two customers, separated by CustomerID and ordered by the OrderDate. I’ve included amount, but it’s really not important.

Steve goes into detail and explains what’s going on each step of the way.  Window functions are extremely useful; check them out if you’re not already familiar with them.

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