Database Detachments And File Permissions

Daniel Hutmacher looks at what happens when you detach a database:

On most database servers, the SQL Server service account is granted full control of the directories that host the database files. It goes without saying that the service account that SQL Server runs on should be able to create, read, write and delete database files. Looking at a sample database on my local server, the .mdf and .ldf files don’t actually inherit permissions from their folder, although the permissions are very similar to that of the folder.

This all makes sense once you read the explanation, but it’s not intuitive behavior.  Read Daniel’s gotcha near the end of the post.

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