Installing Windows Core

Slava Murygin has a screenshot-heavy walkthrough of how to install Windows Server 2016 Core in Hyper-V:

You are supposed to have pre-downloaded Windows Server Installation ISO image.
You can download Evaluation Windows Server from here: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/evalcenter/evaluate-windows-server-technical-preview
For this example I’ve chosen Windows Server 2016 Technical Preview 5.
Note: Do not try to use 64-bit installation on 32-bit workstation. It won’t work.
After you specify the file click “Next”.

Read the whole thing.

Database Scoped Configuration

Mirek Sztajno introduces us to new database-scoped configurations in SQL Server 2016:

  • Enable or disable PARAMETER_SNIFFING at the database level. Disable this option to instruct the query optimizer to use statistical data instead of the initial values for all local variables and parameters when the query is compiled and optimized. This is equivalent toTrace Flag 4136 or the OPTIMIZE FOR UNKNOWN query hint

  • Enable or disable QUERY_OPTIMIZER_HOTFIXES at the database level, to take advantage of the latest query optimizer hotfixes, regardless of the compatibility level of the database. This is equivalent to Trace Flag 4199

  • CLEAR PROCEDURE_CACHE which allows to clear procedure cache at the database level without impacting other databases and without requiring sysadmin permission. This command can be executed using ALTER ANY DATABASE SCOPE CONFIGURATION permission on the database, and the operation can be executed on the primary and/or the secondary

This is an early implementation of functionality, but I think this is a step in the right direction.  Getting finer-grained and database-level configuration settings gets us one step closer to that 2012 dream of containerized databases.

Management Studio Trello Board

Aaron Nelson has set up a Trello board for Management Studio collaboration:

A couple weeks ago I mentioned that we are using Trello to help the community collaborate about what we want next in SQLPS before we submit Connect items to Microsoft.

That effort is going very well.  It’s going so well in fact that when the topic of getting some new improvements into SSMS was brought up, the SQL Tools team suggested that a Trello board to collaborate and prioritize what people want improved in SSMS would be very helpful to them.  Ultimately Microsoft needs Connect items filed but using Trello helps folks to debate and combine ideas.

The cynic in me says “this is what Connect is supposed to do” but Aaron and Chrissy LeMaire had a great deal of success working with the SQLPS team, so here’s hoping they get traction here as well.

Deploying Dacpacs

Richie Lee shows two different methods of automating Dacpac deployment:

DacFx, or to give it it’s full title, the Data-tier Application Framework “is a component which provides application lifecycle services for database development and management for Microsoft SQL Server and Microsoft Azure SQL Databases“. Essentially, it is another method we can use to manage our Dacpacs. However instead of using the external process SQLPackage and initiating it via cmdline you can use C# or PowerShell to manage Dacpacs. In fact, SQLPackage uses the “Microsoft.SqlServer.Dac.dll” itself. You can verify this by going and deleting the dll and trying to run sqlpackage via command line…. or you can just take my word for it.

Read on for the Powershell script Richie uses.

Lambda Architecture

Koos van Strien looks at lambda architecture and asks if it works for data warehouses:

The Lambda Architecture is pretty well documented – online1 as well as in the book I just mentioned2. For a quick overview, Lambda Architecture is basically a system where the raw data is always stored, and never thrown away. All information that’s derived from this raw data is always recomputed – often stated as query = function(all data). This provides for a fool-proof architecture that’s rigorously simple (compared to classic RDBMS solutions), made up of three layers:

Admittedly, about half of this went over my head, but there are some good book and webpage recommendations to learn more about lambda architecture and Data Vault.

“Talk Me Through This Query”

Brent Ozar is working on a series of SQL interview questions.  Today’s is “talk me through this query:”

Last month’s post “For Technical Interviews, Don’t Ask Questions, Show Screenshots” was a surprise hit, and lots of folks asked for more details about the types of screenshots I’d show. Over the next few weeks, I’ll share a few more.

Normally I’d show this query as a screenshot, but for easier copy/pasting into comments, I’m showing it as code here.

I’d say to the job candidate, “You’ve been asked to take a quick look at this code as part of a deployment. Explain what the business purpose of the code is, and tell me if there’s anything that concerns you.”

I like where Brent is going with this series and plan to incorporate some of these into my in-person interviews.

Categories

May 2016
MTWTFSS
« Apr Jun »
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031