Keep Scripts Up To Date

Andy Galbraith points out that scripts need maintained just like everything else:

The broader lesson here is to make sure you update your script libraries regularly – even if a script still runs and provides output (that is, you think it “works”) it doesn’t mean you are receiving valid data.

Although this example is about wait stats and wait types, it is applicable to a wide array of configurations and settings.  Changes like this are often version-related, but even within a version it can be decided that a particular wait type/trace flag/sp_configure setting/etc. is no longer important and can be ignored – or even worse, that some item is now important but wasn’t included in your original scripts!

This is an important note.  Things change over time, so our administrative scripts need to change with them.

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