Database File Info

Mike Fal shows us how to get database file information using Powershell:

To do this, I dove into the SMO object model. This gets a little /Net-y, but the good news is there’s lots of properties we can use to get the information we are looking for. If we look at both the DataFile and LogFile classes, there are properties readily available for us. Both classes have UsedSpace and Size properties (both measured in KB), from which we can derive both available space and percentage used. All it takes is wrapping some collection and formatting logic around these objects and we’re good to go. You can see my full function up on GitHub.

This is a nice example of using the Powershell pipeline to build an end product, in this case an HMTL report of log and file usage.

Related Posts

Collecting PRINT Outputs From Powershell

Jana Sattainathan shows how to query a number of SQL Server instances in parallel using Powershell and collecting the PRINT outputs from each: As an example, you may have a block of SQL that PRINTs out the current privileges in the databasethat can then be saved off and used as an independent script. In my case […]

Read More

Quantifier {x,y} Following Nothing

Shane O’Neill reminds us that reading is fundamental: Glancing at the error message, the first things that stick out are the bits “{x,y}” so I change my regex to be anywhere from 1 to  digits "*\d{1,6}$" Why are you glancing, read the error message! That doesn’t work, so I again quickly scan the error message and see the bit […]

Read More


March 2016
« Feb Apr »