The Logical Data Warehouse

Robert Sheldon is looking beyond the Enterprise Data Warehouse:

Organizations looking to take control of this onslaught of information are turning to other solutions to meet their data needs, either in addition to or instead of the traditional EDW. Quite often this means turning to a logical architecture that abstracts the inherent complexities of the big data universe. Such an approach embraces mixed environments through the use of distributed processing, data virtualization, metadata management, and other technologies that help ease the pain of accessing and federating data.

Dubbed the logical data warehouse (LDW), this virtual approach to a BI analytics infrastructure originated with Mark Beyer, when participating in Gartner’s Big Data, Extreme Information and Information Capabilities Framework research in 2011. According to his blog post “ Mark Beyer, Father of the Logical Data Warehouse, Guest Post ,” Beyer believes that the way to approach analytical data is to focus on the logic of the information, rather than the mechanics:

This feels like something that first-movers are starting to adopt, but won’t be mainstream for another 6-8 years.  That should give the idea some time to mature as we see the first round of successes and (more importantly) failures.

Related Posts

Data Warehousing Versus Data Virtualization

Koos van Strien contrasts data virtualization with data warehouse automation: From a certain viewpoint, one could state that Data Virtualization is focused on the way the world should work: when integrating data, one shouldn’t have to store it everywhere. Why not let the system decide when to store? For some, to adopt this view might […]

Read More

Functional Programming And Microservices

Bobby Calderwood might win me over on microservices with talk like this: This view of microservices shares much in common with object-oriented programming: encapsulated data access and mutable state change are both achieved via synchronous calls, the web of such calls among services forming a graph of dependencies. Programmers can and should enjoy a lively […]

Read More

Categories

November 2015
MTWTFSS
« Jan Dec »
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
30