Giving 110%

SQL Sasquatch shows that his computers go up to 11:

I trust the utilization reported by “Processor Info”.  Note that the greatest reported “Resource Pool Stats” utilization (approaching 120%) is when total “Processor Info” utilization is near 100% across all 12 physical/24 logical cores.  Nominal rating of the core is 3.06 GHz, top SpeedStep is 3.46 GHz.  That would give a maximum ratio of 3.46/3.06 = 113%, which is still under the number reported by SQL Server (for Default pool alone, I’ll add).  Even if the numbers made it seem possible that SpeedStep was responsible for more than 100% utilization reported by SQL Server, I don’t think SpeedStep is the culprit.  The older Intel processors were by default conservative with SpeedStep, to stay well within power and heat envelope.  And no-one’s been souping this server up for overclocking 🙂

So… if my database engine will give 110% (and sometimes more…) I guess I better, too.  🙂

Math is hard.

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