More On Temporal Tables

Randolph West has another nice post on temporal tables, in which he lets the cat out of the bag:

Look at the log records. They are identical to before. In fact, because a trigger is called in the same implicit transaction as the UPDATE statement, we didn’t even need to wrap the INSERT statement in a transaction.

What have we learned?

Temporal tables are doing exactly what an update or delete trigger (or stored procedure) would do, based on what we saw in the log records.

This is an in-depth look at what, exactly, is happening when temporal tables get updated.

R-Based AutoDoc

Steph Locke talks R-based auto-documentation:

When I needed to do an rmarkdown repository for making R Consortium Infrastructure Proposals, I was able to take the opportunity to take Jan’s code and move forward with it so that the ISC proposal is always web-facing. Here’s how I did it:

She’s using this to build the satRday planning site.

PowerShell-Based Health Checks

Omid Afzalalghom discusses an open-source tool using PowerShell to read various DMVs and give you a basic health check:

PowerShell is an ideal tool for doing health-checks of a collection of SQL Server instances, and there are several examples around, but few acknowledge the fact that individual DBAs have their own priorities for tests, and need something easily changed to suit circumstances. Omid’s Healthcheck allows tests to be SQL or PowerShell and requires only adding, altering or deleting files in directories.

Grab the tool from his GitHub repo.

The Future Of Datazen

Meagan Longoria is thinking about the future of Datazen now that Microsoft has acquired them:

Click through for a hypnotizing animated GIF.  Seriously, I needed to close the window after a couple of minutes because I kept watching it over and over and over.

Override

Andy Mallon teaches us when we need to use WITH OVERRIDE on RECONFIGURE:

Should I use WITH OVERRIDE?

Probably not.

That was an easy post. All done! Thanks for reading.

 

……Oh, right. Let’s talk about why.  Books Online actually has the answer:

If that’s too too heavy of reading, you can spend the day on the Transformers Wiki.  I mean, it is Friday, after all.

Starting And Stopping Local Instances

Slava Murygin shows ways to simplify starting and stopping SQL Server services on local instances:

Step 3: Easily Stop SQL Server Service.

That is very possible you performed some very heavy and memory intense operation by your local SQL Server instance and it ate all your free memory. You do not need it anymore, but SQL Server won’t easily give memory back.
The easiest way to claim all your memory is to stop your SQL Server.
There are some easy ways doing it:
– First way us using SQL Server Management Studio. You just have to do a right click on your local SQL Server instance and choose “Stop”.

The use case for Slava’s advice is a scenario in which you have SQL Server installed on a local machine with very little RAM.

Categories

November 2015
MTWTFSS
« Jan Dec »
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
30