SQL Server Updates For MacOS

Meet Bhagdev has a couple MacOS-related announcements for SQL Server.  First, the SQL Server team has released command line tools:

We are delighted to share the production-ready release of the SQL Server Command Line Tools (sqlcmd and bcp) on macOS El Capitan and Sierra.

The sqlcmd utility is a command-line tool that lets you submit T-SQL statements or batches to local and remote instances of SQL Server. The utility is extremely useful for repetitive database tasks such as batch processing or unit testing.

The bulk copy program utility (bcp) bulk copies data between an instance of Microsoft SQL Server and a data file in a user-specified format. The bcp utility can be used to import large numbers of new rows into SQL Server tables or to export data out of tables into data files.

Second, there’s a new ODBC driver available:

  • Azure AD support – You can now use Azure AD authentication (username/password) to centrally manage identities of database users and as an alternative to SQL Server authentication.

  • Always Encrypted support – You can now use Always Encrypted. Always Encrypted lets you transparently encrypt the data in the application, so that SQL Server will only handle the encrypted data and not plaintext values. Even if the SQL instance or the host machine is compromised, an attacker gets ciphertext of the sensitive data.

  • Table Valued Parameters (TVP) support – TVP support allows a client application to send parameterized data to the server more efficiently by sending multiple rows to the server with a single call. You can use the ODBC Driver 13.1 to encapsulate rows of data in a client application and send the data to the server in a single parameterized command.

Multi-platform is the catchword of the day.  If you’re a MacOS user, this might be a portent of things to come.

Community Localization For Crossplatform Tools

Mona Nasr and Andy Gonzalez are looking for tool translation support:

Community has completed the translations for VScode SQL Server extension for six languages: Brazilian, French, Japanese, Italian, Russian, and Spanish.

We still need help with other languages. If you know anyone with language expertise, refer them to the Team Page.

Your contributions are valuable and will help us improve the product in your languages. We hope to continue working with the community in future projects.

Hit up the Team Page link to learn more about how to contribute.

Graph Database Basics

Victoria Holt has some good resources on learning more about graph databases:

There is graph support in the next version of SQL Server. The private preview page states

SQL Graph adds graph processing capabilities to SQL Server, which will help you link different pieces of connected data to help gather powerful insights and increase operational agility. Graphs are well suited for applications where relationships are important, such as fraud detection, risk management, social networks, recommendation engines, predictive analysis, dependence analysis, IoT suites, etc.
Initially, SQL Server will support CRUD graph operations and multi-hop graph navigation, and the following functionality will be available in the private preview:

  • Create graph objects, that is, nodes to represent entities and edges to represent relationships between any 2 given nodes. Both Nodes and Edges can have properties associated to them.
  • SQL language extensions to support join free, pattern matching queries for multi-hop navigation

Kennie Pontoppipidan wrote a great blog post on where to find out more information.

Click through for more links to interesting resources.

Checking Query Settings

Kevin Feasel

2017-03-17

Tools

Angela Henry had a query which worked fine in Management Studio but not in Powershell:

After I dusted off my PowerShell 2.0 documentation, I got my script written and started testing.  I processed several folders and their files before I received the following error while running my PowerShell script:

Invoke-Sqlcmd : String or binary data would be truncated.
The statement has been terminated.
At line:127 char:36
+ … MyResults = Invoke-Sqlcmd -ServerInstance $ServerName `
+                 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ CategoryInfo          : InvalidOperation: (:) [Invoke-Sqlcmd], SqlPowerShellSqlExecutionException
+ FullyQualifiedErrorId : SqlError,Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.PowerShell.GetScriptCommand

Interesting.  I added some Write-Host statements for troubleshooting and found the offending entry.  Like any good programmer, I tested my stored procedure call in SQL Server Management Studio (SSMS) to make sure it really was a SQL Server error and guess what?  It worked just fine!  No errors what so ever.  WTH?!  This is where my tunnel vision sets in.  If it works in SSMS but not in PowerShell, then PowerShell must be the problem, right?  Well, sort of.

Read on for the solution.

Mastering Tools

The folks at Sharp Sight Labs explain that future obsolescence of a tool does not mean you should not master it:

The heart of his critique is this: data science is changing very fast, and any tool that you learn will eventually become obsolete.

This is absolutely true.

Every tool has a shelf life.

Every. single. one.

Moreover, it’s possible that tools are going to become obsolete more rapidly than in the past, because the world has just entered a period of rapid technological change. We can’t be certain, but if we’re in a period of rapid technological change, it seems plausible that toolset-changes will become more frequent.

The thing I would tie it to is George Stigler’s paper on information theory.  There’s a cost of knowing—which the commenter notes—but there’s also a cost to search, given the assumption that you know where to look.  Being effective in any role, be it data scientist or anything else, involves understanding the marginal benefit of pieces of information.  This blog post gives you a concrete example of that in the realm of data science.

SQL Server For Linux Tools

Sanjay Nagamangalam looks at different tools you can use to connect to SQL Server:

  • New SQL command line tools for Linux: We’ve created Linux-native versions of your favorite SQL command line tools such as sqlcmdand bcp and sqlpackage and also added the new mssql-conf tool that lets you configure various properties for the SQL Server instance on Linux (e.g., SA password, TCP port and collation).

  • New versions of SSMS, SSDT and SQL PowerShell: We have released updated versions (v17.0 RC1) of our flagship SQL Server tools including SQL Server Management Studio (SSMS), Visual Studio SQL Server Data Tools (SSDT) and SQL PowerShell with support for the SQL Server v.Next on Windows and Linux.

They also have a plugin for Visual Studio Code, which can be helpful if you’re running on Linux.

Building Your 2016 VM

Kevin Feasel

2016-11-14

Tools

James Serra looks at putting together a VM for 2016:

With Windows Server 2016 just been released, now is the perfect time to build an Azure VM with SQL Server 2016 on Windows Server 2016.  In a matter of minutes you can be playing and learning both platforms.  Below I will document the steps I took to build the VM along with the additional software I installed.  This is a fully-loaded VM that I use for demo’s and to build small projects:

(Software updates as of 11/4/2016)

There’s a lot of good software here.  And Java.

Evaluating Monitoring Tools

Kevin Feasel

2016-09-15

Tools

Richard Douglas has a great post on things to think about when evaluating a monitoring tool:

A question that often comes up in meetings is, “What would success look like?” To me, it’s my favourite football team Spurs winning the English Premier League! This is never a popular answer to the person asking the question in the meeting, but generally raises a few smiles and lightens the mood. However, you’re more likely interested in monitoring software and what success means in that scenario. As I see it, success means finding an outcome that is beyond doubt. Now success could mean that the software you are evaluating is not as good as the current incumbent. That is a successful outcome. You have decided that you already own the best solution for you. Congratulations! It can also mean that a particular solution meets all of the criteria needed by your business in order for it to solve technical issues and to grow.

The advice is vendor-agnostic and is worth reading if you plan to evaluate monitoring tools anytime soon.

Blitz Scripts Open Sourced

Kevin Feasel

2016-06-22

Tools

Brent Ozar announces that the sp_Blitz series of scripts is now open source:

Our prior copyright license said you couldn’t install this on servers you don’t own. We’d had a ton of problems with consultants and software vendors handing out outdated or broken versions of our scripts, and then coming to us for support.

Now, it’s a free-for-all! If you find the scripts useful, go ahead and use ’em. Include sp_Blitz, sp_BlitzCache, sp_BlitzIndex, etc as part of your deployments for easier troubleshooting.

This is very good news.

Categories

May 2017
MTWTFSS
« Apr  
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031