Press "Enter" to skip to content

Category: Wait Stats

Session-Level Wait Stats

Arun Sirpal points out that SQL Server 2016 has a session-level wait stats DMV:

This tells me about the waits since my last reboot or since a manual reset of the stats. It’s probably why you should do at least time-based analysis or reset the wait stats before starting, that is if you are interested in something time specific or if you want to understand certain workloads at a given time.

So the other option is that you could go down the session level route. With the session based analysis I took the query and changed it slightly to query sys.dm_exec_session_waits_stats and also pull back the session_id that I am interested in.

I had no idea this was available, and it’s something that I’ve wanted for a very long time, so that’s excellent.

Comments closed

Wanted: Database-Level Wait Stats

Arun Sirpal would like to see database-level wait stats:

Wait Stats is my “go-to” thing, when you want to dig into performance issues everyone knows you will probably end up using sys.dm_os_wait_stats. You cannot use this in the Azure world, you have to use a DMV that is scoped to the database level. I think this would be a nice idea to have with the “earth” based SQL Servers – the ability to return information about all the waits encountered by threads that executed at the database level.

The connect item can be found at this link: https://connect.microsoft.com/SQLServer/feedback/details/2647332/sys-dm-db-wait-stats-dmv?tduid=(262281c4c73a682498780643b77e80d1)(256380)(2459594)(TnL5HPStwNw-KjxCoz0pGWobbq7q1MQTIw)()

I like this idea.

Comments closed

Looking For Wait Types

Ewald Cress uses the debugger to search for particular waits:

In this case I was looking for PREEMPTIVE_COM_RELEASE, and sys.dm_xe_map_values tells me that on my 2014 RTM instance it has an index of 01d4 hexadecimal. Crazy as it sounds, I’m going to do a simple search through the code to look for places that magic number is used. As a two-byte (word) pattern we’ll get lots of false positives, but fortunately wait types are internally doublewords, with only one bit set in the high-order word. In other words, we’re going to look for the pattern 000101d4, 000201d4, 000401d4 and so forth up to 800001d4. Ignore the meaning of when which bit is going to be set; with only sixteen permutations, it’s quick enough to try them all.

Let’s focus on sqllang as the likely source – the below would apply to any other module too.

This post reminds me that my debugger skills aren’t very good.

Comments closed

Wait Stats

David Alcock provides an introduction to wait stats and why they’re useful for performance tuning:

So here are two different ways that we can use SQL Servers wait statistics for troubleshooting purposes. Both views give us really useful information but both have different purposes. If we wanted to look back over time then the sys.dm_os_wait_stats will give us a view of wait time totals. Typically we would capture the information via a scheduled job and analyse the data for spikes during periods where issues might be suspected.

For performing real-time analysis of wait statistics then we should base queries on the sys.dm_os_waiting_tasks view where we can see accurate wait duration values as they are happening within our instance.

In my opinion wait statistics are the most important piece of information when troubleshooting SQL Server so learning about the different types is vital for anyone using SQL. Thankfully there is a wealth of really useful information about wait statistics out there; I’ve listed some of my favourite posts below.

Click through for an example, as well as links to more resources.

Comments closed

Benchmarking Azure SQL Database Wait Stats

John Sterrett explains wait stats and which stats are most important for Azure SQL Database:

With an instance of SQL Server regardless of using IaaS or on-premise, you would want to focus on all the waits that are occurring in your instance because the resources are dedicated to you.

In database as a service (DaaS), Microsoft gives you a special DMV that makes troubleshooting performance in Azure easier than any other competitor.  This feature is the dm_db_wait_stats DMV.  This DMV allows us specifically to get the details behind why our queries are waiting within our database and not the shared environment.  Once again it is worth repeating, wait statistics for our database in a shared environment.

Click through for a stored procedure John has provided to collect wait stats in a Waits schema.

Comments closed

Collecting Wait Stats

Kendra Little on collecting wait stats as part of a baseline:

I do love wait stats!

If you listened to the performance tuning methodology I outlined in an earlier episode, you saw how important I think wait stats are for troubleshooting performance.

If you missed that episode, it’s called Lost in Performance Tuning. (I’ve got an outline of the discussion in the blog post, as always.)

I agree with Kendra’s advice that buying a vendor tool is the right choice here, whenever it’s possible.  It’s fairly likely that you’ll spend more money creating (and maintaining) your own scaled-down version of a vendor tool than biting the bullet and paying for a packaged product.

Comments closed

Waits And Latches

Paul Randal has come out with his comprehensive wait and latch type library:

I present to the community a comprehensive library of all wait types and latch classes that have existed since SQL Server 2005 (yes, it includes 2016 waits and latches).

The idea is that over time, this website will have the following information about all wait types and latch classes:

  • What they mean

  • When they were added

  • How they map into Extended Events (complete for all entries already)

  • Troubleshooting information

  • Example call stacks of where they occur inside SQL Server

  • Email link for feedback and questions

It’s not complete yet, but entries are thorough.

Comments closed

Azure SQL Database Wait Stats

Grant Fritchey discusses Azure SQL Database wait stats:

You’ll notice that these results are wildly different from those above. What we’re looking is largely a server versus a database, but not completely. I mean that sys.dm_os_wait_stats is showing the waits for the instance on which my primary Azure SQL Database is currently running. Most of those waits are mine, but because it’s part of the management structure of Azure, sys.dm_os_wait_stats shows some information that’s not applicable, directly, to me. The “server” is not really that. It’s a logical container holding your database. There’s a lot more to it under the covers. To get the waits that are absolutely applicable to me and my databases, I have to go to sys.dm_db_wait_stats.

Azure SQL Database is going to behave a bit differently from on-premise SQL Server, so if you’ve got an Azure SQL Database, pay attention to those differences.

Comments closed

ASYNC_NETWORK_IO

Dave Ballantyne discusses the ASYNC_NETWORK_IO wait stat:

Simply put ASYNC_NETWORK_IO waits occur when SQL Server is waiting on the client to consume the output that it has ‘thrown’ down the wire.  SQL Server cannot run any faster, it has done the work required and is now waiting on the client to say that it has done with data.

Naturally there can be many reasons for why the client is not consuming the results fast enough , slow client application , network bandwidth saturation, to wide or to long result sets are the most common and in this blog I would like to show you how I go about diagnosing and demonstrating these issues.

Dave goes on to explain this using Management Studio examples, but the information also applies to other client applications.

Comments closed