When Wait Stats Aren’t Enough

Joe Obbish has an example of diagnosing performance problems when wait stats don’t indicate any problems:

In summary, page allocations and page free events rapidly occur, sometimes in an alternating pattern. SQL Server will often free a number of pages just to immediately request allocations for a similar number of pages. If all of the free page events result in returned memory to the OS then the reason for the scalability bottleneck becomes clear. When running the full workaround with 96 concurrent sessions, a total of 341965 page freed operations were performed. Those events freed about 71.3 million pages in total. That amounts to about 584 GB of memory returned to the OS in total, based on the previous assumptions.

This is a great investigation into the depths of debugging in SQL Server.  Joe wasn’t able to get a definitive solution to his problem, but he showed us a lot along the way.

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