Recovery_Pending State After Moving SQL Server Files

Jon Shaulis gives us a couple of reasons why our databases could be stuck in Recovery_Pending state after moving file locations:

The scripts I ran to edit the rest of the databases looked similar to the below:

Once I finished altering all of my database files to their new locations, I stopped the SQL Server Service in Services. I copied and pasted all MDF and LDF files to their correlated new destinations and then started the SQL Server Service once more.

That’s when I ran into the interesting issue of “Recovery in a Pending state”. Some digging and sleuthing brought me back to my scripts.

Read on for those causes.

Using APPLY To Aggregate Unpivoted Data

Dan Clemens gives us yet another practical use of the APPLY operator:

I had a situation last week where I needed to find the MIN() and MAX() values of some data. Normally this would be pretty straightforward, but the problem was I needed to identify the MIN() and MAX() values amongst multiple columns. So today I bring you a SQL tip using APPLY.

Looking at sys.procedures we can see I have a create_date and a modify_date column for each record. What if we needed to return the MIN() or MAX() value from those 2 (or more) columns?

SELECT [Name]
,create_date
,modify_date
FROM sys.procedures AS p
WHERE p.[name] = 'ChangePassword';

In this two-column example, it’s not too difficult.  As you add more and more columns, the solution remains the same, though the urge to ask why all of these dates are unpivoted might increase…

Faking Arrays In T-SQL With Custom Types

Jovan Popovic shows how to use custom types as pseudo-arrays in SQL Server:

One of the missing language features in T-SQL language is array support. In some cases you can use custom types to work with arrays that are passed as parameters to your stored procedures.

Custom types in T-SQL enable you to create alias for some table, .Net or built-in type. Once you create a custom type, you can use it for local variables and parameters of functions.

I go back and forth on whether I’d like full array support in T-SQL, as on the plus side, it simplifies interactions with external tools.  On the other hand, it can promote bad habits like violating first normal form.

Estimating Columnstore Compression

Niko Neugebauer has a way of estimating disk size after creating a columnstore index on a table:

For anyone working with SQL Server since version 2005 (with Service Pack 2 to be precise) there is a very common task when thinking or research the system optimisation – the usage of the compression, and before advancing with this step the question that one usually receives is – “can you estimate how much improvement we shall get?”
For this purpose since SQL Server 2008, we have a very useful stored procedure that is called sp_estimate_data_compression_savings, that is capable of providing us with the estimation of how much storage we can save by enabling or moving to a more effective compression method (as in NONE | ROW | PAGE types).
Columnstore Indexes have appeared in SQL Server 2012 (that is well over 6 years ago) and even though from time to time I would ask and suggest to enable the stored procedure sp_estimate_data_compression_savings to start supporting Columnstore Indexes, until now there is no such support.

Until now – I am introducing a conjunction of my scripts in a comprehensive and reasonably capable stored procedure that is called “cstore_sp_estimate_columnstore_compression_savings” and that is a part of my free & open-sourced Columnstore Indexes Script Library, freely available on GitHub.

That’s a useful addition, especially when you’re trying to sell management on using clustered columnstore indexes.

The Evolution Of Hadoop

Holden Ackerman has an interesting analysis of Qubole customers’ adoption of Hadoop 2:

In Qubole’s 2018 Data Activation Report, we did a deep-dive analysis of how companies are adopting and using different big data engines. As part of this research, we found some fascinating details about Hadoop that we will detail in the rest of this blog.

A common misconception in the market is that Hadoop is dying. However, when you hear people refer to this, they often mean “MapReduce” as a standalone resource manager and “HDFS” as being the primary storage component that is dying. Beyond this, Hadoop as a framework is a core base for the entire big data ecosystem (Apache Airflow, Apache Oozie, Apache Hbase, Apache Spark, Apache Storm, Apache Flink, Apache Pig, Apache Hive, Apache NiFi, Apache Kafka, Apache Sqoop…the list goes on).

I clipped this portion rather than the direct analysis because I think it’s an important point:  the Hadoop ecosystem is thriving as the matter of primary importance switches from what was important a decade ago (batch processing of large amounts of data on servers with direct attached storage) to what is important today (a combination of batch and streaming processing of large amounts of data on virtualized and often cloud-based servers with network-attached flash storage).

DISTINCT, GROUP BY, And Transaction Isolation Levels

Rob Farley has an interesting post where two similar-looking queries can provide different outputs given certain transaction isolation levels:

Now, it’s been pointed out, including by Adam Machanic (@adammachanic) in a tweet referencing Aaron’s post about GROUP BY v DISTINCT that the two queries are essentially different, that one is actually asking for the set of distinct combinations on the results of the sub-query, rather than running the sub-query across the distinct values that are passed in. It’s what we see in the plan, and is the reason why the performance is so different.

The thing is that we would all assume that the results are going to be identical.

But that’s an assumption, and isn’t a good one.

Rob starts out with READ UNCOMMITTED but then gets into the “normal” READ COMMITTED transaction isolation level that most places use.

Allowing Azure Service Access

Arun Sirpal points out the importance of a tiny checkbox:

When you create a “logical” Azure SQL Server (I say logical because we are not really physically creating anything) there is a setting that is ticked ON by default which is called “Allow Azure services to access server”.

The question is, what does it mean? (See the highlighted section below)

Read on to see what this does and why Arun doesn’t like the default.

SQL Persistent Storage In Azure Container Services

Andrew Pruski shows how to use Kubernetes persistent volumes in Azure Container Services:

I’ve been playing around with SQL Server running in Kubernetes in Azure Container Services (AKS)for a while now and I think that the technology is really cool.

You can get a highly available instance of SQL Server up and running with a few lines of code! Ok, there’s a bit of setup to do but once you get that out of the way, you’re good to go.

One thing that has been missing though, is persistent storage. Any changes made to the SQL instance would have been lost if the pod that it was running in failed and was brought back up.

Until now.

Click through to learn how.  It’s certainly not trivial, but Andrew does a good job showing us the step-by-step.

TreeViz Custom Power BI Visual

Devin Knight continues his Power BI custom visuals series:

In this module you will learn how to use the TreeViz Custom Visual. The TreeViz is a breakdown tree that allows you to expand or collapse levels of hierarchical data.

Click through for the video, showing more.  For limited, hierarchical, categorical data, this could work pretty well.

Date Correlation Optimization

Monica Rathbun explains another quasi-hidden SQL Server configuration option:

According to MSDN – The DATE_CORRELATION_OPTIMIZATION database SET option improves the performance of queries that perform an equi-join between two tables whose date or datetime columns are correlated, and which specify a date restriction in the query predicate.

How many of you read what MSDN says and thinks “wuuuuuttt, English please”? I do.

Read on for the English translation.

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