Request: Add Support for Row Pattern Recognition

Itzik Ben-Gan would like to see Row Pattern Recognition make it into T-SQL:

The ISO/IEC 9075:2016 standard (aka SQL:2016) introduces support for Row Pattern Recognition (RPR) in SQL. Similar to using regular expressions to identify patterns in a string, RPR allows you to use regular expressions to identify patterns in a sequence of rows.

To me, it’s the next step in the evolution of window functions. If you think that window functions are profound and useful, RPR is really going to bake your noodle.

RPR has limitless practical applications, including identifying patterns in stock market activity, handling time series, fraud detection, material handling, shipping applications, DNA sequencing, gaps and islands, top N per group, and many others. 

I’ve voted it up and recommend you do so too. This is a great way to think of streams of data sitting in a database. If you have business use cases where this could help, adding those as comments would be great too.

Auto-Escaping XML Characters

Emanuele Meazzo shows how you can auto-escape XML characters using T-SQL:

Recently I had to look up the definition for a bunch of SQL objects and didn’t want to manually retrieve them manually in SSMS (with Create Scripts) or Visual Studio (by searching the object name in my TFS repository).

Since lazyness and automation are the basis of a well done engineering work, I wanted to create a list, where I could basically click on the object that I needed and see the definition right away, without any tool or having to code something externally, of course.

Click through for the solution, which is short and sweet.

Defending ANSI-89 Syntax

Allan Hirt prefers ANSI-89 join syntax:

Pedro Lopes who is now on the SQL Server dev team wrote the blog post “T-SQL Misconceptions – JOIN ON vs. WHERE” which does a good job of explaining the “it depends” around the newer style of joins. Why link this article? Microsoft deprecated the OUTER JOIN operators in SQL Server 2008. Two other sources of information on this are here and here (the first is Ward Pond’s old technet blog, and sadly will probably go away soon). If you’re keeping score at home, WHERE clauses are not deprecated except if you’re using *= and =*). The changes people made were wholly unnecessary and as the author, the newer stuff is harder to decipher than what I originally did. They were putting their own biases onto things.

I personally do not like ANSI-89 syntax because it blurs the lines between filters and join criteria. Those are separate things serving different purposes and keeping them separate clarifies queries more than it obscures. Allan’s example doesn’t have any filters but in a more complex scenario with several filters and several join criteria, it can require extra care figuring out what’s going on, especially with multi-column join criteria and filters mixed in (meaning it’s not join criteria and then filters, but a mishmash of the two).

Pivoting Performance Counter Data

Dave Bland shows how you can build a dynamic pivot to see performance counter data over a stretch of time:

The next step is to write the code to capture the counter values and insert the data it the temporary table created above.  Because we need to capture the values over a period of time, the WAITFOR DELAY is used.  In this case the delay is 10 seconds, although you can change this to suit your needs. Of course, don’t forget to increment the counter variable. You will need to determine what counters you would like to capture.  Notice in the WHERE clause, we are looking for an instance_name of ” or ‘_total’.  This will allow the code to only capture one row for each counter.  The number 10 is the number of times we want to capture the counter values.  If you want to capture the data more frequently, simpley modify the number of seconds in the WAITFOR DELAY.  Here is link to my post in this topic, WAITFOR.

Dynamic pivoting in SQL is unnecessarily difficult, especially compared to languages like R.

Calculating Weighted Averages in SQL

Kevin Feasel

2019-03-19

Syntax

Lukas Eder shows how you can calculate weighted averages using SQL:

As can be seen, this schema is slightly denormalised as the number of lines per transaction are precalculated in the transactions.lines column. This will turn out to be quite useful for this calculation, but it isn’t strictly necessary.

Now, in the previously linked Stack Overflow question, a report was desired that would calculate:
– An aggregation of sums as provided by the line items
– An aggregation of averages as provided by the transactions

As Lukas points out, doing this in two queries is easy, but doing it in one is sublime.

Performance Testing Simple Scalar UDF Functions

Wayne Sheffield tries out a simple scalar UDF in SQL Server 2019 to see how it performs:

I recently published a post detailing the new Scalar UDF Inlining feature in SQL 2019 here. That post introduced the new feature in a way that I used to compare performance to the other function types, continuing the performance evaluation of functions that I had previously posted here and here. In the Scalar UDF Inlining post, I used a function to strip all non-numeral values from a string, and to return the result. This used the FOR XML output option.

In thinking about how scalar functions are commonly used, I’ve decided to revisit this feature with a simpler function. I will still compare it to all the other types of functions to see how Scalar UDF Inlining compares to the others.

Wayne’s results are music to the product team’s ears, I’m sure.

Comparing STRING_AGG Performance Against FOR XML PATH

Jeffry Schwartz compares the performance of STRING_AGG in SQL Server 2017 versus the tried and true method of FOR XML PATH for string concatenation:

Two different T-SQL methods were used for testing.  The FOR XML PATH solution incorporates the reverse and stuff functions along with FOR XML PATH.  The String_agg solution is much simpler, but is only available on SQL Server 2017 currently.

The FOR XML PATH method has been documented thoroughly over the years in many articles, so these explanations will not be repeated here.  However, two points are worth mentioning.  The first one is that the @strSeparator (in this case ‘ or  ’) string will reside at the end of the constructed string (in this case @strFilter).  Since the last occurrence of @strSeparator must be removed to prevent a syntax error, characters must be dropped from the end of the string.  Although it may seem obvious that four characters (the length of @strSeparator) should be removed, actually only three need be removed because the end of the constructed string is “r” not “ “.  Therefore, the length argument of the left function specification is the length of @strFilter minus three.

I like STRING_AGG a lot, primarily because I can remember it and I can explain it to people relatively new to SQL Server. Read on to see how they both compare in terms of performance.

Benefits of Inline Indexes

Phil Factor covers a topic fairly close to my heart:

Usually, the added features of the CREATE TABLE syntax in new releases of SQL Server are esoteric, and unless you are dealing with memory-optimized tables or other esoteric stuff, they aren’t of great interest. However, the Inline INDEX for both a table and column index has just crept in quietly with SQL Server 2014 (12.x). This was interesting because the SQL Server team back-fitted it to all tables rather than just in-memory OLTP tables for which it was, at the time, found necessary. The new syntax was introduced which allows you to create certain index types inline with the table definition. These could be at column level, concerning just that column, or at the table level, with indexes containing several columns.

Why interesting? This affects multi-statement table functions, user-defined table types, table-valued parameters as well as table variables. It was considered a game-change for table variables because, for a start, it allowed non-unique indexes or explicit clustered indexes to be declared on columns for the first time because you can create indexes on table variables as part of the table definition. Of more significance were the table-level indexes that allowed you to specify multi-column indexes. Previous releases had allowed multi-column primary or unique constraints, but not explicitly named indexes. You still cannot declare an index after the table is created, which is a shame as there are good reasons for being able to do so after a table is stocked with data. Any sort of large import of data into a table that is over-indexed or prematurely-indexed is doomed to crawl rather than to run. I’ll show this later on in this article.

Click through for an analysis of inline indexes themselves as well as how they fit on table variables—something I tend not to do much.

UNCOMPRESS Isn’t DECOMPRESS

Solomon Rutzky strives to solve the question, “What is the UNCOMPRESS function anyhow?”:

With no clear indications of what the UNCOMPRESS function does, we can at least pass in some simple values to see what comes back, and see if we can make sense of the output. For the following tests, please keep in mind that “8-bit” refers to the VARCHARCHAR, and TEXT (deprecated) datatypes. And, “16-bit” refers to the NVARCHARNCHARNTEXT (deprecated),and XML datatypes.

Read on as Solomon figures out what it does and how non-useful it is for anybody nowadays.

COUNT And NULL

Bert Wagner explains some of the trickiness of COUNT and NULL values in SQL Server:

One thing I see fairly often (and am occasionally guilty of myself) is using COUNT(DISTINCT) and DISTINCT interchangeably to get an idea of the number of unique values in a column.

While they will sometimes give you the same results, depending on the data the two methods may not always be interchangeable.

Click through for examples.

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