Alternate Credentials

Daniel Hutmacher shows us various techniques for starting Management Studio under different Windows credentials:

The easy way to solve this is to just log on directly to the remote server using Remote Desktop and use Management Studio on that session, but this is not really desirable for several reasons: not only will your Remote Desktop session consume quite a bit of memory and server resources, but you’ll also lose all the customizations and scripts that you may have handy in your local SSMS configuration.

Your mileage may vary with these solutions, and I don’t have the requisite skills to elaborate on the finer points with regards to when one solution will work over another, so just give them a try and see what works for you.

I prefer Daniel’s second option, using runas.exe.

Checking Users And Principals

Shane O’Neill walks through a permissions issue and cautions against jumping the gun:

All the above is what I did.

Trying to fix the permission error, I granted SELECT permission.
Trying to fix the ownership chain, I transferred ownership.
Mainly in trying to fix the problem, I continually jumped the gun.
Which is why I am still a Junior DBA.

To be fair, I’d argue that if you intended to have replicated objects live in a different schema, the second action was fine.  Regardless, the advice is sound.

Presentation Versus Storage

Edwin Sarmiento looks at how data is stored on disk when you use Dynamic Data Masking or Always Encrypted in SQL Server 2016:

Looking at the data, the masked columns appear as they are on disk. This validates Ronit Reger’s statement on his blog post Use Dynamic Data Masking to obfuscate your sensitive data.

* There are no physical changes to the data in the database itself; the data remains intact and is fully available to authorized users or applications.* Note that Dynamic Data Masking is not a replacement for access control mechanisms, and is not a method for physical data encryption.

In contrast, the encrypted columns are encrypted on disk and the data types are different on disk compared to how they were defined in the table schema – SSN is defined with nvarchar(11) while CreditCardNumber is defined with nvarchar(25). This means that those “valuables” are even more secured on disk, requiring additional layers of security just to get access to them.

Read the whole thing.

Row-Level Security

Steve Jones talks about row-level security:

I’ve wanted this feature to be easy for a long time. In fact, I’ve implemented a similar system a few times in different applications, but it’s been a cumbersome feature to meet, plus each developer needs to understand how the system works for it to work well. Even in the case where we once used views to hide our RLS, it was a performance issue.

Microsoft has made things easier with their Row Level Security feature. This was actually released in Azure in 2015, but it’s now available in SQL Server 2016 for every on premise installation as well.

Essentially for each row, there is some data value that is checked to determine if a user has access. This doesn’t mean a join. This doesn’t mean you write a lot of code. The implementation is simple, and straightforward, and I like it.

The implementation is pretty easy, but I’m concerned about the performance.  At least from my early view, this adds a good bit of performance drag on your queries.  That’s not so bad in a data warehouse environment, but in a busy transactional system, I’m not sure it can keep up.  I’d be interested in hearing other thoughts, though.

Checked C

Microsoft has introduced Checked C:

Checked C is a modified version of C that addresses the issues that arise with pointers, C’s mechanism for accessing memory directly. The language provides several new kinds of pointer and array types that come with built-in safeguards. They’re distinct from the existing unsafe pointer types in C, so a programmer can use the new, checked pointer types for safety and revert back to the unsafe types if that’s ever required.

The new version also provides checked program scopes. These are blocks of the program code where bounds checking is turned on by default. If the programmer attempts to use an unchecked pointer within such a scope, the compiler will reject it. It’s also possible to specify that a whole program be checked by default, by way of a compiler #pragma directive

I wonder how much traction this language will get.  I can imagine most of the people still writing C code being innately anti-Microsoft and anti-external checks.

Spark Security

Dave Wang discusses the Databricks Enterprise Security framework:

The Databricks just-in-time data platform takes a holistic approach to solving the enterprise security challenge by building all the facets of security — encryption, identity management, role-based access control, data governance, and compliance standards — natively into the data platform with DBES.

  • Encryption: Provides strong encryption at rest and inflight with best-in-class standards such as SSL and keys stored in AWS Key Management System (KMS).
  • Integrated Identity Management: Facilitates seamless integration with enterprise identity providers via SAML 2.0 and Active Directory.
  • Role-Based Access Control: Enables fine-grain management access to every component of the enterprise data infrastructure, including files, clusters, code, application deployments, dashboards, and reports.
  • Data Governance: Guarantees the ability to monitor and audit all actions taken in every aspect of the enterprise data infrastructure.
  • Compliance Standards: Achieves security compliance standards that exceed the high standards of FedRAMP as part of Databricks’ ongoing DBES strategy.

In short, DBES will provide holistic security in every aspect of the entire big d

As enterprises come to depend on technologies like Spark and Hadoop, they need to have techniques and technologies to ensure that data remains secure.  This is a sign of a maturing platform.

sp_help_revlogin

Chrissy LeMaire wants to deprecate sp_help_revlogin:

Now you’ve migrated the logins with their passwords, SIDs, and a few default properties. But you don’t have the logins’ server roles, server permission sets, database roles or database permission sets. So now you gotta find and use someone’s modified version of sp_help_revlogin, but you’re still left with manually executing the procedure against your source and destination servers.

Oh, and don’t forget different versions of SQL Server use different hashing algorithms, so you’ll need to use one of the many different versions of sp_help_revlogin if you have a mixed environment.

Let’s hope you only have one or two SQL Servers to migrate and not hundreds.

Chrissy has a couple of great Powershell cmdlets to help get rid of this procedure, as well as a nice explanation of each and Youtube videos should you be so inclined.  Definitely check it out, as well as her dbatools Powershell suite.

PCI Compliance

Denny Cherry reminds us that SQL Server 2005 is no longer PCI compliant:

If you are running a PCI compliant system on SQL Server 2005 you are going to fail your next audit. One of the audit requirements is that the vendors must support the version of your software which you are running on. As Microsoft no longer offers support for SQL Server 2005 that’s going to cause you to fail your next PCI audit.

Microsoft’s serious about sunsetting old versions of SQL Server, and at this point, there have been five versions of SQL Server released since 2005.

Row-Level Security With Reporting Services

Paul Turley discusses combining row-level security, SQL Server Reporting Services, and SQL Server Analysis Services:

In every data source connection string, you can add a simple expression that maps the current Windows username to the CUSTOMDATA property of the data source provider.  This works in SSRS embedded data sources, shared data sources, in a SharePoint Office Data Connecter (ODC) file and in a SharePoint BISM connection file.  In each case, the syntax should be the similar.  Here is my shared data source on the SSRS 2016 report server

This is pretty snazzy.  Paul goes into good detail on the topic, so read the whole thing.

Azure Key Vault Connector Available

Rebecca Zhang notes that Azure Key Vault is now available to all:

When using these SQL encryption technologies, your data is encrypted with a symmetric key (called the database encryption key) stored in the database. Traditionally (without Azure Key Vault), a certificate that SQL Server manages would protect this data encryption key (DEK). With Azure Key Vault integration for SQL Server through the SQL Server Connector, you can protect the DEK with an asymmetric key that is stored in Azure Key Vault. This way, you can assume control over the key management, and have it be in a separate key management service outside of SQL Server.

The SQL Server Connector is especially useful for those using SQL Server-in-a-VM (IaaS) who want to leverage Azure Key Vault for managing their encryption keys. SQL IaaS is the simplest way to deploy and run SQL Server, and it is optimized for extending existing on-premises SQL Server applications to the cloud in a hybrid IaaS scenario, or supporting a migration scenario.

Read on for more details.

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