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Category: Learning

Goodbye, MCSE

John Deardurff helps break the news:

Major Announcement from Microsoft Learning today. As Microsoft continues to invest in role-based learning offerings, the Microsoft Certified Solutions Associate (MCSA), Microsoft Certified Solutions Developer (MCSD), and Microsoft Certified Solutions Expert (MCSE) certifications will be phased out with a final retirement date of June 30th, 2020. Find the entire list of retired certifications here.

On the plus side, at least people who hold the next iteration of the MCSE won’t be confused with people who worked with NT4 anymore…

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2020 Data Professional Salary Survey Results

Brent Ozar has another year of salary data for us:

A few things to know about it:

– The data is public domain. The license tab makes it clear that you can use this data for any purpose, and you don’t have to credit or mention anyone.
– The spreadsheet includes the results for all 4 years (2017-2020.) We’ve gradually asked different questions over time, so if a question wasn’t asked in a year, the answers are populated with Not Asked.
– The postal code field was totally optional, and may be wildly unreliable. Folks asked to be able to put in small portions of their zip code, like the leading numbers.
– Frankly, anytime you let human beings enter data directly, the data can be pretty questionable – for example, there were 14 folks this year who entered annual salaries below $500. If you’re doing analysis on this, you’re going to want to discard some outliers.

It’s on my agenda (somewhere…probably a bit further back than I’d like) to dig into this year’s data and try to come up with something a little more comprehensive now that there are four years of data.

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Chesterton’s Fence in Development Terms

Pete Warden picked a blog post title I couldn’t refuse:

This script came to mind as I was thinking back over the year for a few reasons. One of them was that I spent a non-trivial amount of time writing and debugging it, despite its small size and the apparent simplicity of the problem it tackled. Even in apparently glamorous fields like machine learning, 90% of the work is nuts and bolts integration like this. If anything you should be doing more of it as you become more senior, since it requires a subtle understanding of the whole system and its requirements, but doesn’t look impressive from the outside. Save the easier-to-explain projects for more junior engineers, they need them for their promotion packets.

The reason this kind of work is so hard is precisely because of all the funky requirements and edge cases that only become apparent when code is used in production. As a young engineer my first instinct when looking at a snarl of complex code for something that looked simple on the surface was to imagine the original authors were idiots. I still remember scoffing at the Diablo PC programmers as I was helping port the codebase to the Playstation because they used inline assembler to do a simple signed to unsigned cast. My lead, Gary Liddon, very gently reminded me that they had managed to ship a chart-topping game and I hadn’t, so maybe I had something to learn from their approach?

I am a huge fan of the concept which, made brief, states that if you do not understand why something is the case, don’t change it. If you do understand it, maybe change it but be prudent about it. It’s also something I have often trouble with, as my natural inclination toward code bases is to use the cleansing power of fire to burn it all down.

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Why So Few Columnstore Indexes Around?

Grant Fritchey has a bit of a rant about people not using Columnstore indexes as much as they should:

It was already common knowledge that columnstore indexes didn’t work for most of us.

Fact is, that’s not true. Now that we have clustered columnstore and non-clustered columnstore, you can go nuts. Most of your data access is through analytical channels? Awesome, use a clustered columnstore. Sometimes though, you need point lookups. Not a problem, add a nonclustered b-tree index to the clustered columnstore. Go here to learn more about Columnstore Indexes.

In short, today, we can completely orient our data storage with our principal data access. Yet, most people are not using these things at all.

One of my interview questions is about columnstore indexes. I’ve learned that I needed to preface it with “What’s the latest version of SQL Server you’ve worked with?” A lot of people answer 2012. Even among the people who use 2016, the normal answer is that they haven’t learned about columnstore yet. And that goes back to Grant’s learning gap: it’s not that hard to grab a book on SQL Server 2019, spin up a Docker container, and dive in. Or watch a course, spin up a Docker container, and follow along. Or read a blog post, spin up a Docker container, and…well, you get the idea.

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Learning to Learn

Buck Woody has a great post on learning how to learn:

In this new world of fast-paced learning, you’ll often find that you have to “throw away” what you’ve learned, meaning that a new language or tool is out now that requires your attention, and you won’t return to the one you know now. That doesn’t mean your hard study was wasted, because you’ll often find that new technology builds on the one you just learned, but I find that Type-A technologists are loath to drop something they just learned. You’ll have to get over that – it’s the way it is.

However, it can be true that once you learn something, it may be in an area that you just had to come up to speed on quickly, or it has “staying power” and will be around for a while. In that case, take this same process, and repeat all the steps, taking time to fill in the gaps and go much deeper in the areas you didn’t spend time on during your speed learning.

I really liked this post. The first thing it reminded me of was Sir Francis Bacon’s Of Studies (pdf, but with bonus content from Samuel Johnson), specifically the part about how we should superficially breeze through some books, but that others we must digest. The same goes with technologies.

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Why the DBA is Important

Melody Zacharias takes us through five areas where DBAs are important in the SQL Server 2019 world:

Databases are the beating heart of digital transformation. Businesses increasingly realize that having a unified view gives them a competitive advantage in a world where data is king. The task of breaking down those silos will fall to highly skilled DBAs using cool new technologies such as PolyBase [https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/sql/relational-databases/polybase/polybase-guide?view=sql-server-ver15]. Although it was introduced in SQL Server 2016, PolyBase got a whole lot more interesting in SQL Server 2019 with the ability to query external SQL Server, Oracle, Teradata, and MongoDB using T-SQL. Our world just got a whole lot bigger!

Read on for the full set of reasons. My agreement with this comes with one caveat: DBAs are important insasmuch as they are willing to grow, try new things, and develop skills. If you’re a stodgy type who hasn’t learned a thing since SQL Server 2008, you’ve got a shelf life.

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On the Certification Debate

Grant Fritchey has thoughts on certifications:

However, you frequently see people, usually the ones with 47 certificates, going on and on about how, just one more cert, just one more, this time, I’ll get the job I want.

Nope.

Let me break the news. Experience, a proven track record, and knowledge are what get you jobs. And yes, I understand, how do you get experience without first getting a job? That is indeed the hurdle. I’m just telling you that certifications are not the rocket in your bottom that will throw you over that hurdle.

Also connections (which Grant also points out in the post which you should read). Connections land many more jobs than certifications. Most certifications are as much noise as signal, which greatly dilutes the value of the thing. Once again I lament the loss of the MCM, one of the few certifications with a near-zero percent noise rate due to how difficult it was and how many things you needed to understand to get past it. But even with it, experience and networking will get you much further.

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Using Show-Command in Powershell

Kenneth Fisher walks through the Show-Command cmdlet in Powershell:

Years ago I blogged about how I like to use the SSMS scripting feature to learn how to do things. Well now I’m starting to learn Powershell and it turns out there is a GUI here as well that will help me learn to script. At least in a very basic way. For example, if I want to see what parameters are actually available for Get-Help and maybe script out a template to work with then I can do this:

Show-Command Get-Help

Read on to see how you can put this into action.

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Learning About Big Data Clusters

Kevin Chant shares resources for getting started with SQL Server Big Data Clusters:

In a previous post I shared current SQL Server 2019 learning resources, which you can view in detail here.

However, SQL Server 2019 Big Data Clusters are very involved. So, I thought I better dedicate a whole post to further learning resources for it.

Because some people have different learning methods I have included references to both documents and videos in this post. In addition, I have created the below links in case somebody wants to go directly to a specific section.

Kevin’s put together quite a few useful links here.

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