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Category: IoT

Building a Friendship Lamp

Drew Furgiuele is looking for mood lighting tips:

It did get me thinking, though: what if I could take this idea and change it up a bit to where people could send me messages WITHOUT the need for them to have a lamp (and thereby give them plausible deniability of being, in fact, my friend). How would that work? In absence of a lamp, would a web application work? And what if we could let people pick a color in lieu of an actual message? You could send a whole mood!

And just like that, my motivation was restored. Time to get to work.

Click through for the build process, which includes 3D printing components, wiring and soldering to circuit boards, writing software for the IoT device, building the front-end web app, and more. Also, I sent red but now I’m not sure if I regret that color choice based on re-reading the first paragraph above.

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Running Azure SQL Edge on Kubernetes

Andrew Pruski isn’t satisfied with one Raspberry Pi:

I’ve been playing around with Kubernetes for a while now and things like Azure Kubernetes Service are great tools to learn but I wanted something that I’d built from the ground up.

Something that I could tear down, fiddle with, and rebuild to my heart’s content.

So earlier this year I finally got around to doing just that and with Azure SQL Edge going GA with a disconnected mode I wanted to blog about my setup.

Click through to see how to do this.

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Understanding Digital Twins

Kurt Cagle explains a concept:

At the core of such digital twins is the notion of a model. A model, in the most basic definition of the word, is a proxy for a thing or process. A runway model, for instance, is a person who is intended to be a proxy for the viewer, showing off how a given garment looks. An artist’s model is a stand-in or proxy for the image, scene, or illustration that an artist is producing. An architectural model is a simulation of how a given building will look like when constructed, and with 3D rendering technology, such models can appear quite life-like. Additionally, though, the models can also simulate more than appearance – they can simulate structural integrity, strain analysis, and even chemistry interactions. We create models of stars, black holes, and neutron stars based upon our understanding of physics, and models of disease spread in the case of epidemics.

This is a really good explanation of the concept. Contrast with the explanation of, say, Azure Digital Twins. The first time I saw it, I thought one thing; then, when I read the intro page, I thought something different. Then, I walked through the demo and thought something yet again different. I might have just missed the part where it lays out exactly what a digital twin is and its importance but I do like Kurt’s explanation a lot more.

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Managing Azure IoT Digital Twins with Python

Paul Hernandez continues a series on digital twins:

As mentioned in my previous post, Azure Digital Twins (ADT) Service is a new way to build next generation IoT solutions. In the first post I show you in a video how to manage ADT instances with the ADT Explorer. In the second post I show how to do mostly the same but using Postman and the ADT Rest API.

ADT has control plane APIs and data plane APIs. The latest is used to manage elements in the ADT instance. In order to use these APIs Microsoft published a .Net (C#) SDK. And SDK is a convenient way to manage instances, since you can easily create applications for your digital twins. If for any reason you prefer to use another language like java, javascript or python, you need to generate your own SDK.

In this post I describe how to autogenerate a Python SDK using the tool Autorest and a swagger file.

Read on to see how you can manage digital twins by generating an SDK.

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Understanding Digital Twins in IoT Hub

Paul Hernandez explains the concept of digital twins in the IoT space:

Azure Digital Twins Service offers a way to build next generation IoT solutions. There are other approaches on the market to describe IoT devices and build digital twins. Without making a formal comparison I can say with the Azure Digital Twins is possible to build a powerful semantic layer on top of your connected devices using domain specific models.

To show you how this work let’s create a kind of “hello world” example. An end-to-end solution is out-of-scope of this post. Instead I will create some hands-on tutorial to demonstrate some of the functionalities.

Click through to see an example.

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