Unresolved Reference In Database Project

Ed Elliott explains something fairly straightforward and gives us a primer on using Stack Overflow too:

If you build an SSDT project you can get an error which says:

“SQL71502: Function: [XXX].[XXX] has an unresolved reference to object [XXX].[XXX].”

If the code that is failing is trying to use something in the “sys” schema or the “INFORMATION_SCHEMA” schema then you need to add a database reference to the master dacpac:

Click through for the answer and a comment-by-comment walkthrough from Ed.

Linked Servers And Inaccessible Statistics

Jason Brimhall troubleshoots an error message involving linked servers and statistics:

On more than one occasion I have had an emergency request because everything was broken. The everything in almost every incident is an SSIS package that is failing with error messages. The error message will typically have text similar to the following:

Could not locate statistics ‘_WA_Sys_00000015_346C780E’ in the system catalogs.

Due to the error, the package fails processing and grinds to a halt. When diving into the package it is discovered that the missing stats happen to be coming from a linked server query. This raises a big bright blaring alarm for me. Why is the SSIS package accessing the data via a linked server? This is rather counter-productive and definitely contrary to what is desired from a performance perspective.

Jason methodically walks us through the troubleshooting process and provides the solution at the end.

Errors Using Native Prediction In SQL Server

Sacha Tomey walks us through a few potential issues when converting code which uses SQL Server Machine Learning Services’s sp_execute_external_script procedure to native PREDICT calls:

Stumble One:

Error occurred during execution of the builtin function 'PREDICT' with HRESULT 0x80004001.
Model type is unsupported.

Reason:

Not all models are supported. At the time of writing, only the following models are supported:

  • rxLinMod
  • rxLogit
  • rxBTrees
  • rxDtree
  • rxdForest

sp_rxPredict supports additional models including those available in the MicrosoftML package for R (I was using attempting to use rxFastTrees). I presume this limitation will reduce over time. The list of supported models is referenced in the PREDICT function (Documentation).

sp_rxPredict does require CLR, but it’s a viable alternative if you need to use a model not currently supported—like rxNeuralNet.

Automatic Retry With Optimistic Concurrency

Vladimir Khorikov explains an anti-pattern when dealing with a model using optimistic concurrency (for example, memory-optimized tables):

Alright, back to the original question. So, how to combine optimistic locking and automatic retry? In other words, when the application gets an error from the database saying that the versions of a Product don’t match, how to retry the same operation again?

The short answer is: nohow. You don’t want to do that because it defeats the very purpose of having an optimistic lock in the first place.

Remember that the locking mechanism is a way to ensure that all changes are taken into consideration when changing a record in the database. In other words, someone should review the new version of the record and make an informed decision as to whether they still want to submit the update. And that should be the same client who originated the initial request, you can’t make that decision for them.

Plenty of systems do this sort of data merging automatically, but I get Vladimir’s point:  if someone else pulled the rug out from under you, it might change your decision on what that data should look like.

Invalid Class Error Trying To Access WMI Class

Claudio Silva troubleshoots an error which gives the user a red herring:

This can return more than one line with different ComputerManagement (like ComputerManagement10). It depends on the versions you have installed on the host. The number “10” refers to the SQL Server 2008.
Now I can uncomment the last command and run it. The result is:

Get-CimInstance : Invalid class
At line:1 char:1
+ Get-CimInstance -CimSession $CIMsession -Namespace $(“rootMicrosoftSQLServerC …
+ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ CategoryInfo : MetadataError: (:) [Get-CimInstance], CimException
+ FullyQualifiedErrorId : HRESULT 0x80041010,Microsoft.Management.Infrastructure.CimCmdlets.GetCimInstanceCommand
+ PSComputerName : HOST001

Ok, a different error message. Let’s dig in it. I logged in on the host and confirmed that I have a SQL Server 2008 R2 instance installed. This means that I’m not accessing a lower version than 2005 like the initial warning message was suggesting.

Read the whole thing.

Errors With Invalid Backup Location

Adrian Buckman shows the types of errors you should expect when your default backup location is invalid:

Recently I was looking through the error log on one of my test machines and I spotted some unusual errors:

SQL ERROR: 3634 – The operating system returned the error ‘3(The system cannot find the path specified.)’ while attempting ‘DeleteFile’
SQL ERROR: 18272 – During restore restart, an I/O error occurred on checkpoint file (operating system error (null)). The statement is proceeding but cannot be restarted. Ensure that a valid storage location exists for the checkpoint file.

At first I assumed that I may have tried restoring a database to a location that did not exist but this was not the case, the actual issue was with SQL Server’s Default Backup Location.

Read on for the full explanation.

Failure Modes In Event-Based Systems

Dave Copeland has an interesting article on understanding how message- and event-based systems can fail:

The system trigger (1) initiates everything. Common failures here are timeouts inside Application. This is particularly insidious because when this happens, the System Trigger may retry the operation. Think about a user on a webpage getting a 500 error. They will likely retry what they were doing until it succeeds.

This means that the entire workflow could be triggered multiple times, and it could be done in a way that is not programmatically obvious. Imagine our Merchandise buyer marking down an item’s price, and the entire operation succeeds but at the last minute their Internet connection dies and they get an error. They will repeat the markdown action and now there will be two messages about the inventory price being sent.

This is an interesting read.  Also, definitely check out Dave’s earlier post on how there is no happy path; it seems that most developers only code for a chimera, as there is so much code that assumes everything will work perfectly.

R Services 182 Error

Joey D’Antoni provides a solution to a tricky SQL Server R Services error:

Recently, and unfortunately I don’t have an exact date on when this started failing (though it was around service pack 1 install time) with the following error:

Error
Msg 39012, Level 16, State 1, Line 10
Unable to communicate with the runtime for ‘R’ script. Please check the requirements of ‘R’ runtime.
STDERR message(s) from external script:

DLL ‘C:\Program Files\Microsoft SQL Server\MSSQL13.MSSQLSERVER1601\MSSQL\Binn\sqlsatellite.dll’ cannot be loaded.
Error in eval(expr, envir, enclos) :
DLL ‘C:\Program Files\Microsoft SQL Server\MSSQL13.MSSQLSERVER1601\MSSQL\Binn\sqlsatellite.dll’ cannot be loaded.
Calls: source -> withVisible -> eval -> eval -> .Call
Execution halted
STDOUT message(s) from external script:

Failed to load dll ‘C:\Program Files\Microsoft SQL Server\MSSQL13.MSSQLSERVER1601\MSSQL\Binn\sqlsatellite.dll’ with 182 error.

Click through to see how to resolve this issue.

Tracking Database Restoration-Related Errors

Adrian Buckman has a script which tracks error messages related to database restorations:

In one of my previous posts I went over a scenario where an Auto restore job was logging Restore errors to a table and the error that was being inserted was ‘3013 – RESTORE LOG is terminating abnormally’ and this was due to SQL Server only providing the Last most error produced which is stored within ERROR_NUMBER() and ERROR_MESSAGE() at point of error.

I found this error less than useful so I set out to try and log something more meaningful , which I ended up doing for the specific error (4305) which was being encountered at the time, but I wanted to make this better and less specific to the 4305 error.

This is a very interesting post and a good example of using built-in error handling functionality to help automate your processes.

Grooming The Error Log

Mark Wilkinson explains how to keep your SQL Server error logs in check:

We typically think of error logs as somewhere to go to find issues, but what if your error logs ARE the issue? Like most anything else in SQL Server, if you neglect your error logs you can run into trouble. Even on a low-traffic SQL Server instance, a bad piece of code, or a hardware issue, could easily fill your error logs, and with the introduction of Hekaton in SQL Server 2014, the SQL Server error log started getting a lot more data pumped into it than you might have been used to before. What this means for the DBA is that you can quickly start filling your main system drive (if your SQL install and error logs are in the default location) with massive error logs. So what questions should you be answering about error logs to make sure you don’t run into problems?

Read on to learn more.

Categories

August 2019
MTWTFSS
« Jul  
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293031