SQL Server’s Built-In Monitoring

Jason Brimhall has a three-part series on the types of monitoring built into SQL Server. Part one is an overview and includes the Default Trace:

The default trace by itself is something that can be turned off via configuration option. There may be good reason to disable the default trace. Before disabling the default trace, please consider the following that can be captured via the default trace. I will use a query to demonstrate the events and categories that are configured for capture in the default trace.

Part two looks at the system_health Extended Event session:

Beyond being a component of the black box for SQL Server, what exactly is this event session? The system_health is much as the name implies – it is a “trace” that attempts to gather information about various events that may affect the overall health of the SQL Server instance.
The event session will trap various events related to deadlocks, waits, clr, memory, schedulers, and reported errors. To get a better grasp of this, let’s take a look at the event session makeup based on the available metadata in the dmvs and catalog views.

Part three is the sp_server_diagnostics stored procedure:

Beyond being a component of the black box for SQL Server, what exactly is this diagnostics process? The sp_server_diagnostics is much as the name implies—it is a “diagnostics” service that attempts to gather information about various events that may affect the overall health of the SQL Server instance.
The diagnostics process will trap various server related health (diagnostics) information related to the SQL Server instance in an effort to try and detect potential failures and errors. This diagnostics session/process traps information for five different categories by default. There is a sixth category of information for those special servers that happen to be running an Availability Group.

I’ve used the first two but did not know about the third. Jason goes into good depth on each, showing you the types of information you can get out of these. Read the whole thing.

Reasons Why We Get Identity Column Gaps

Steve Jones walks through several reasons why you might see gaps in identity columns:

Deleting Rows
This is noted in the tweet as a cause, but let’s test this.
One of the common ways that we get gaps in identity values is when rows are deleted. Let’s remove the row with Steve in it.

Steve explains a few others, but even that’s not complete: identity columns can jump after the service restarts as well.

In short, please do not use identity values in cases where you need to guarantee sequentiality (like check numbers or invoice numbers). Don’t use sequences either, as they’ll behave similarly.

Troubleshooting Network Issues From The Command Line

Jeff Mlakar walks us through a few tools for troubleshooting network connectivity solely from the command line:

NSLOOKUP
The nslookup command can check the name which an IP address will resolve to or which IP address resolves to a name (aka reverse lookup). This can be done either way as shown:

After having spent the long weekend futzing with Server Core instances for an upcoming project, I can also recommend learning the Powershell tools as well.

Service Broker External Activator And .NET Framework

Allen White walks us through a problem he experienced recently:

My test environment is running SQL Server 2017 on Windows Server 2016, a pretty vanilla environment. After downloading the appropriate installer for the server where the service was to run, I installed it, made the necessary changes to the config file per the documentation provided after installation, assigned the service account with the necessary privileges, and attempted to start the service.

In the Windows System error log, I got three messages.

Read on for the solution.

Using Powershell As Your Default Prompt On Windows Server Core

Patrick Gruenauer shows us how to make Powershell the shell of choice when running on Windows Server Core:

Well, if you’re running a Server Core (I hope so, for domain controllers, dns, file services and more there’s no good reason to do not so), then it’s an ease to change that. The corresponding setting has to be configured in the registry. Regedit can be opened on Server Core (there are more graphical user interfaces that are shipped with core, for example notepad.exe and timedate.cpl). I’m talking about this key:

Click through for the instructions.

Service Account Names And SQL Agent Not Starting Up After Reboots

Hamish Watson walks us through a weird scenario:

Looking at the event logs I (eventually) found this:
Event ID 7000:
The MSSQLSERVER service failed to start due to the following error: 
The account name is invalid or does not exist, or the password is invalid for the account name specified.
Which is bizarre – as the service account had been used for months – but after each reboot the services had to be manually started. GPO and other things had been blamed but no one could actually find out why.

I’ve never used @ naming for service accounts, so until I read this I didn’t even know it was possible.  Now I’m going to forget again because apparently it’s not a good idea.

Tips On Running SQL Server In RDS

Matthew McGiffen shares some tips on running SQL Server in Amazon RDS:

Or you can go with Amazon RDS (Relational Database Service).  This is more of a managed service where Amazon looks after some aspects of your database server for you. In return you give up some of the control you would have with your own server or VM. You can still pick the version of SQL Server you want installed, usually down to which cumulative update you want – though note that RDS normally lags behind the latest box version of SQL by 3 months or so. RDS is what’s known as a PaaS offering (Platform as a Service).
So, what do you give up and what do you gain? Here’s a quick summary of a few things I’ve noticed. This is not intended to be comprehensive and please bear in mind that AWS is a fast-moving beast – changes happen regularly.

There are some good tips here, so check them out.

Disabling SQL Agent Jobs For Maintenance Periods

Jon Shaulis shows us a way to disable SQL Agent jobs with T-SQL:

A user had a unique issue where their system would have dynamically changing job names and schedules, but they need to disable and re-enable them during maintenance. Obviously, this is a huge headache.
I made a recommendation that they should ultimately create a list of currently enabled jobs that had a schedule using a system query.

SELECT *
FROM MSDB.dbo.sysschedules ss
     INNER JOIN msdb.dbo.sysjobschedules jss
ON jss.schedule_id = ss.schedule_id
WHERE ss.enabled = 1;
The code above returns all schedules that are paired to a job that are enabled. The enabled = 1 flag and the inner join to the sysjobschedules table are what dictate those filters.

Read on for more details about what’s going on and some caveats.

Tips For Migrating SSISDB

Kenneth Fisher shares some thoughts on SSISDB:

We’ve been doing a lot of upgrading recently and at one point had to move an instance from one 2016 server to another. In the process, we found out (the hard way) that it’s not that easy to move SSISDB (the SSIS Catalog that may or may not be named SSISDB). I mean it’s not hard, but it’s definitely not a basic backup/restore. The full BOL instructions on how to do this are here. That said, here are the elements that are involved.

Read on for the list as well as an order of operations.

Finding The SQL Server Port With T-SQL

Jack Vamvas shows us how to find the port SQL Server is listening on using T-SQL:


Question: Without going into the SQL Server Configuration manager via the GUI is there a command oriented method to extract the port number SQL Server is listening on?
 
Answer: There are a few different methods to extract the port number without going into the Configuration interface.
Method 1 – use xp_readererrorlog

Read on for an explanation of this technique as well as links to a couple other methods.  I hadn’t thought about using the error log as a source, but it works.

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