Press "Enter" to skip to content

Determining Why Constraints Are Untrusted

Tom Zika adopts a zero-trust constraint architecture:

Okay, so you went through the effort of fixing them, but the next day your constraints are not trusted again. What gives?

If you are sure none of the DBAs or developers is doing this to spite you, the most common culprit is a BULK INSERT or bulk copy tool (bcp).

One of its parameters is -h(hints)
and one of those hints is CHECK_CONSTRAINTS

Read on to see how this can mess everything up, as well as how you can track and fix it. There are cases, particularly in extremely high-write systems, where you don’t necessarily need the constraint to exist but want it to be there for documentation purposes. In that case, the constraints are usually disabled rather than simply untrusted. The other time I see people purposefully using untrusted constraints is that old data is garbage and essentially unfixable but they want new data to be correct. Most of the time, though, constraints are untrusted because nobody noticed the problem.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.