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Thread Pool Exhaustion and Availability Groups

Sean Gallardy lays down the gauntlet:

You’re probably wondering why you couldn’t spawn a new thread, why this error happened, why you shouldn’t just up the max worker threads, and probably also thinking this must be some kind of “bug” in SQL Server. So here’s where our awkward conversation starts… It’s you. Contrary to every relationship breakup you’ve ever had, it’s definitely you. I’m not saying this to be mean but to really drive the point home here. The major reasons for this occurring are large blocking chains, too much workload for the server size (databases, users, etc.), and/or your virtual infrastructure sucks. There aren’t too many reasons for getting yourself into this situation, and while what I’ll be putting forth here isn’t exhaustive of all edge cases and scenarios, these are by far the majority of all the items in the wild that I’ve either worked on or have been involved in at some level. Side Note: If you’ve read this far, are shaking your head, calling me names that an irate sailor might utter, and telling yourself that upping the max worker threads as the product error suggests and Microsoft should fix their bugs then you can stop reading here as you’re probably not open to learning why you have issues in your environments.

One more scenario I’ve seen is mirroring thousands of databases on a single instance. That scenario fit none of Sean’s criteria—there was very little blocking, most of the databases were small and infrequently-used, and the infrastructure was the right size. It was just a huge number of databases and each database requiring a minimum of X worker threads. Mind you, it was still a bad idea…

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