Enabling Database-Level Change Tracking

Kevin Feasel

2019-08-21

T-SQL

Tim Weigel continues a series on change tracking:

If you don’t provide a retention period, SQL Server’s default is 2 days. Auto-cleanup defaults to ON unless you tell it otherwise.

Easy!

The table level commands aren’t any more complicated. Before we get started, please note that change tracking requires a primary key on the table you want to track. This is reasonable – you need some kind of unique identifier to tell you which row has changed.

Read on for the scripts and further explanation.

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