Storing Passwords in the Database

Randolph West explains the problems with storing passwords in the database and explains the best alternative:

If you are storing passwords in a database, you should stop doing that immediately. We, as software developers and data professionals, should never know what passwords our customers are using. The same goes for most sensitive data: we technical staff probably don’t need to know what’s in there. Some stuff should be hashed, and some stuff should be encrypted.

There’s good advice here.

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August 2019
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