Antivirus and SQL Server

Randolph West proffers advice should your IT team require installing antivirus software on a server with SQL Server running:

This is why it is documented that we should exclude SQL Server from any AV (anti-malware) detection products, so that it can get on with doing what it does best.

Yes, it’s formally documented. This is why we should read documentation when installing things. While it’s super-easy to click “Next,” “Next,” “Next,” that should not be the case with a complex product like SQL Server.

Read on for the list of exceptions you should add and processes to avoid scanning.

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