Warning on Azure Consumption

Kevin Feasel

2019-06-20

Cloud

Daniel Hutmacher doesn’t want you to have any Azure billing surprises:

I wrote this quick-and-dirty script to let me know if I happen to forget to turn off a P15 instance, or if I configure a service with a super-expensive performance tier without realizing. Maxing out your free Azure credits may be depressing enough, but emptying your credit card could really put you in the hurt locker.

So, here’s a Powershell script that warns me before any of this happens. It uses the Azure Consumption API to check how much money we’ve racked up on a subscription so far, and if any single instance exceeds, say, 50% of that total cost, it sends a notification to a Slack channel.

The wallet you save may be your own.

Running Confluent Platform with .NET

Niels Berglund shows how you can install Confluent Platform as a Docker container and use the .NET client against it:

What we see in Figure 16 are the various project related files, including the source file Program.cs. What is missing now is a Kafka client. For .NET there exists a couple of clients, and theoretically, you can use any one of them. However, in practice, there is only one, and that is the Confluent Kafka DotNet client. The reason I say this is because it has the best parity with the original Java client. The client has NuGet packages, and you install it via VS Code’s integrated terminal: dotnet add package Confluent.Kafka --version 1.0.1.1:

Definitely use the Confluent client. The others were from a time when there was no official driver; most aren’t even maintained anymore.

What Public Permissions Get You

Jason Brimhall shows all you can do by default with the public role in SQL Server:

It is amazing what some people will do that just doesn’t make sense. Granting permissions to the public role is one of these cases. That behavior also explains why there are documents and procedures for hardening the public role (here and here).

If necessary, I recommend locking down your public role. It will make your job a little easier and give you better rest at night.

Read the whole thing.

Ownership Chaining and Temp Stored Procedures

Kenneth Fisher wants to see how security for temporary stored procedures works:

With normal stored procedures there is something called ownership chaining. Without going into a lot of detail about what it means, let’s say that you run a stored procedure. SQL is going to check the permissions to see if the stored procedure can update that table right? Well, who’s permissions? Yours? Well, yes, if you have permissions you are fine. But you won’t always. If you don’t then SQL is going to check the owner of the stored procedure (dbo?) and see if they also own that table. If so then we’re golden, perform the update. That might seem scary but it’s pretty normal.

What was scary (at least to me) is the question “How is that handled for a temp stored procedure?”

Read on for the results of Kenneth’s tests.

Configuring the Windows Subsystem for Linux

Kevin Feasel

2019-06-20

Linux

Drew Furgiuele is too cool for Windows shells:

Microsoft has provided a native Linux experience for Windows, called the Windows Subsystem for Linux, or WSL. If you haven’t heard of this feature yet, here’s the short version of what this means:

– “Install” a Linux distribution of you choice into your Windows 10 environment, which
– Enables you to run common Linux command line tools, like grep and sed, which is something your Linux using friends and co-workers have been bragging about since like, forever, and
– Gives you access to other Linux applications and commands, available via your chosen distribution’s package manager, and oh before I forget
– Gives you an honest-to-goodness native SSH shell experience on your machine without the need for a third party application

Sounds cool, right? Well, it is. 

It is.

Scripting Objects with SSMS

Michelle Haarhues shows two ways to script out database objects in SQL Server Management Studio:

There are a multitude of reasons why users script existing objects within SQL Server.  Depending on the reason will dictate whether you are scripting one object, a few objects, or the entire database.  There are different tools within SQL Server Management Studio (SSMS) that will help you create object scripts.

Click through for the two methods.

dbatools 1.0 Available

Chrissy LeMaire and a cast of thousands have officially released dbatools 1.0:

We are so super excited to announce that after 5 long years, dbatools 1.0 is publicly available!

Our team had some lofty goals and met a vast majority of them . In the end, my personal goal for dbatools 1.0 was to have a tool that is not only useful and fun to use but trusted and stable as well. Mission accomplished: over the years, hundreds of thousands of people have used dbatools and dbatools is even recommended by Microsoft.

Go forth and update.

Docker Desktop Resource Limits

Andrew Pruski lays out the default resource limits for Linux and Windows containers using Docker Desktop on Windows:

Docker Desktop is a great product imho. The ability to run Windows and Linux containers locally is great for development and has allowed me to really dig into SQL Server on Linux. I also love the fact that I no longer need to install SQL 2016/2017, I can run it in Windows containers.

However there are some differences between how Windows and Linux containers run in Docker Desktop. One of those differences being the default resource limits that are set.

Read on to see how they differ and how to deal with Windows container resources.

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