Max Dispatch Latency in Extended Events

Dave Bland takes us through the Max_Dispatch_Latency property for an Extended Event:

You would logically think that the minimum setting would be zero seconds.  If you think that way, you are correct.  However, 0 does not mean 0 seconds.  When this is set to 0 it means the event will stay in the buffer until the buffer becomes full.  This is the same set setting the “Unlimited” option you see below. Given this, the true minimum is one second.

Read on to see what it does and why it can be important.

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