Defining Tidy Data

Kevin Feasel

2019-05-14

R

John Mount shares thoughts about the concept of tidy data:

A question is: is such a data set “tidy”? The paper itself claims the above definitions are “Codd’s 3rd normal form.” So, no the above table is not “tidy” under that paper’s definition. The the winner’s date of birth is a fact about the winner alone, and not a fact about the joint row keys (the tournament plus year) as required by the rules of Codd’s 3rd normal form. The critique being: this data presentation does not express the intended data invariant that Al Fredrickson must have the same “Winner Date of Birth” in all rows.

My spin on it is that tidy data is Boyce-Codd Normal Form but may subsequently be denormalized. This may reintroduce violations of 3NF (as in Mount’s example) and sometimes 2NF, but does not change the shape of the variables themselves—that is, a variable still represents a single thing and exists per observation.

Visualizing Earthquake Data

Giorgio Garziano continues a series on analyzing earthquake data:

This is the third part of our post series about the exploratory analysis of a publicly available dataset reporting earthquakes and similar events within a specific 30 days time span. In this post, we are going to show static, interactive and animated earthquakes maps of different flavors by using the functionalities provided by a pool of R packages as specifically explained herein below.

Giorgio looks at 9 separate R mapping packages, so you get your money’s worth here.

Testing Maximum Rows in Table Value Constructors

Solomon Rutzky dives into how big a table value constructor can be in terms of rows:

On 2019-05-08, a helpful individual, Michael B, commented on my answer saying that the 1000-row limit only existed when using a TVC as the VALUES clause of an INSERT statement. And, that there was no limit when using a TVC as a derived table.

Could this be true?

Solomon finds out. Click through and so can you.

Automating Log File Expansion

Max Vernon shows how you can automatically expand log files to optimize VLF counts:

SQL Server Database Log file expansion can be fairly tedious if you need to make the log bigger in many reasonably-sized growth increments. It can be tedious because you may need to write and execute a large number of ALTER DATABASE ... MODIFY FILE ... commands.

The following code automatically grows a SQL Server Database log file, using the size and growth increments you configure in the script. If you set the @DebugOnly flag to 1, the script will only print the commands required, instead of executing them. This allows you to see what exactly will be executed ahead of time. Alternately, you could copy-and-paste the commands into a query window and execute them one-by-one.

Click through for that code.

Unioning Sets with Powershell

Shane O’Neill gives us a rundown of unions in Powershell:

For me, it summed down to “Is there something like UNION or UNION ALL in PowerShell?

Luckily, this is something that I had asked before and been told the answer. So here I am, repeating the answer for you all since this is how I learn; repetition and practice.

Read on to see what Shane comes up with.

Azure Data Studio May Release

Alan Yu announces the May release of Azure Data Studio:

Since its release two months ago, the community continues to love SQL Notebooks. This month, we had a laser-eyed focus on quality of life bug fixes instead of new features. These improvements include:

– Markdown rendering improvements, including better support for notes and tables
– Usability improvements to the toolbar
– Markdown links for trusted notebooks no longer requires Command/Ctrl + click and can be clicked directly
– Improvements in cleaning up Jupyter processes after closing notebooks and reducing errors when starting multiple notebooks concurrently
– Improvements to SQL Notebook connections to ensure errors don’t occur when running two notebooks against the same database
– Improvements to notebook auto-scrolling to the currently executing cell when clicking the run cells button from the toolbar
– General stability and performance improvements

And based on some of the GitHub comments, I’m going to really like the June release if those changes all make it in.

Memory Pressure and Azure SQL Managed Instances

Kevin Feasel

2019-05-14

Cloud

Jovan Popovic takes us through determining whether we have enough memory on an Azure SQL Managed Instance:

Managed Instance has memory that is proportional to the number of cores. As an example, in Gen5 architecture you have 5.1GB of memory per vCore, meaning that 8-core instance will have 41GB memory. Periodically you should check is this amount of memory good for your workload.
 
Do not monitor does the Managed Instance use ~100% of available memory. Some people believe that this is an issue (like hitting 100% CPU), but this is expected and desired behavior. Managed Instance should use as much as possible memory to cache the pages from disk into the buffer pool. The only case where you will not see near 100% usage of memory is the case where you have the databases much smaller that the available memory size so all of them can fit into the memory.

The spoiler version is that it’s the same process as on-prem.

Azure Data Factory: Mapping and Wrangling Data Flows

Kevin Feasel

2019-05-14

Cloud, ETL

Cathrine Wilhelmsen explains the difference between Mapping Data Flows and Wrangling Data Flows in Azure Data Factory:

Now, we all know that the consultant answer to “which should I use?” is It Depends ™ 🙂 But what does it depend on?

To me, it boils down to a few key questions you need to ask:
– What is the task or problem you are trying to solve?
– Where and how will you use the output?
– Which tool are you most comfortable using?

Read on to see how they both work.

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