Using Powershell Core in Containers

Anthony Nocentino shows us how we can run Powershell Core in containers:

Now, with that last technique, we’ve encapsulated the entire lifecycle of the execution of that script into one line of code. It’s like this script execution never happened…or did it 😉 All kidding aside, we effectively have a serverless computing platform now. Using this technique in our data centers, we can spin up a container, on any version of PowerShell on any platform, run some workload/script and when the workload finishes, the container just goes away. For this to work well, we will need something to drive that process. In an upcoming blog post, we’ll talk more about how we can automate the running of PowerShell containers in Kubernetes.
 
In this post, we covered a lot, we looked at how you can interactively run PowerShell Core in a container, how you can pass cmdlets into a container at runtime, running different versions of PowerShell Core and also how you can persistently store scripts outside of containers in volumes and run those scripts in your containers. We also looked at how you can encapsulate the whole execution of a script and the containers life cycle into one line of code. Really giving you the ability to run PowerShell Core anywhere on any platform.

Check it out for sure. Containers today are where VMs were about a decade ago: becoming more common but still a bit “out there” for administrators. It’s not a stretch to say that within a few years, containers will be as ubiquitous as VMs were by 2012, if not more so.

Related Posts

Making SpeedPASSes Better

Wayne Sheffield shares some useful tips for making the SpeedPASS experience better: As things were wrapping up for our event last year, there was an important change made at the SQLSaturday site for dealing with SpeedPASSes. Previously, the admission ticket was sized differently from everything else, which created hassles in cutting and in using perforated […]

Read More

Pulling Docker Images

Grant Fritchey starts us off slowly with containers: The first command you have to learn is ‘docker pull’. You then have to supply something for it to pull, an image that will be used to create your containers. I’m using Powershell for the commands I’m posting this week. Here’s how you get an image with […]

Read More

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Categories

May 2019
MTWTFSS
« Apr  
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031