Importing a Private Key From VARBINARY

Solomon Rutzky tries out various methods of loading certificates and private keys in SQL Server:

These results confirm that:
1. You can import a certificate from a VARBINARY literal
2. You can import a private key when creating a certificate from a VARBINARY literal
3. You cannot import a private key when creating a certificate from an assembly
4. Except when creating a certificate from an assembly, any combination of sources for the certificate (i.e. public key and meta-data) and the private key should be valid

It’s a long post with a lot of detail and quite a few tests, so check it out.

Related Posts

Why Root Containers are Troublesome

Andrew Pruski explains to us why it can be bad to have a container user running as root: Recently I noticed that Microsoft uploaded a new dockerfile to the mssql-docker repository on Github. This dockerfile was under the mssql-server-linux-non-root directory and (you guessed it) allows SQL Server containers to run as non-root. But why is running a container as […]

Read More

Shared Access Signatures

Arun Sirpal explains what an Azure Shared Access Signature is: Using a Shared Access Signature (SAS) is usually the best way to control access rights to Azure storage resources (like a container for backups) without exposing the primary / secondary storage keys. It is based on a URI and this is what I want to […]

Read More

Categories

April 2019
MTWTFSS
« Mar May »
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
2930