Putting TempDB Files On Azure IaaS D Drive

John McCormack tries out using the temporary drive on Azure VMs for tempdb:

Azure warn you not to to store data on the D drive in Azure VMs, but following this advice could mean you are missing out on some very fast local storage. It’s good general advice because this local storage is not permanently attached to your instance, meaning you could lose data or log files if your VM is stopped and restarted but what if you could afford to lose certain files? Say files that are recreated during startup anyway.

TempDB is the ideal candidate for this. No other database is suitable! Putting the tempdb data and log files onto D drive can be achieved quite easily with a little bit of effort. And you will most likely see a big improvement in tempdb read/write latency.

John ended up seeing much bigger gains than I did when I tried this, but with a difference that big, it’s definitely worth using the temporary drive for tempdb.

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