Backing Up SSRS Encryption Keys

Jonathan Kehayias reminds us to back up those SQL Server Reporting Services encryption keys:

If you run SQL Server Reporting Services, part of your DR plan needs to include a backup of the encryption key for SSRS. This sadly is an all to often overlooked part of the solution, even though it is incredibly easy to do. If you don’t have a backup of the encryption key during a restore, the report server will never be able to decrypt the encrypted content (connection strings, passwords, etc) stored in the database, and your only recourse would be to delete the encrypted content and recreate it manually or through a redeployment of datasources.

Jonathan includes a couple of links to good resources. Your backups are only good if they include all of the keys and certificates you used. But keep those certificates stored someplace other than where the backups are stored.

Related Posts

The Prevalence of Persistent XSS

Adrian Colyer has a review of a security-minded paper: Does your web application make use of local storage? If so, then like many developers you may well be making the assumption that when you read from local storage, it will only contain the data that you put there. As Steffens et al. show in this […]

Read More

Using Windows Authentication on Non-Windows Devices

Drew Furgiuele shows us how to connect to SQL Server using Windows Authentication if you’re not coming from a Windows device: SQL Server supports different kinds of authentication mechanisms and protocols: the older NTLM protocol, and Kerberos. A lot of people cringe when you mention Kerberos because, well, Kerberos is hard. It’s arcane, it’s complex, and it’s […]

Read More

Categories

March 2019
MTWTFSS
« Feb Apr »
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031